Quincy College makes list of ‘military-friendly’ schools

September 29, 2014

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY – Quincy College has been named a military-friendly school for the fourth straight year.

Victory Media announced this week that the city’s community college was again on its list of military-friendly schools. The school, which has campuses in Quincy Center and Plymouth, is among roughly 1,600 schools in the nation – and 37 in Massachusetts – on the list.

Victory Media is a group that focuses on issues related to military personnel returning to civilian life. It honors colleges, universities and trade schools.

Quincy College, which accepts education benefits for vets and their dependents such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Montgomery GI Bill, also offers a discount program not funded by the government. The program allows veterans to enroll in liberal arts or professional program classes at a discounted rate.

Quincy College was recently awarded a community grant for trying to meet veterans’ needs. The college says it plans to use the grant money to create programs to address issues faced by returning vets.

New deans at Quincy College

September 6, 2014

PatriotLedger.com

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Quincy College welcomes three new deans: Vincent van Joolen, dean of natural and health sciences; Michael Marrapodi, dean of inter-institutional affairs and online programs; and William Brennan, interim dean of professional programs.

QUINCY – Quincy College welcomes three new deans this academic year: Vincent van Joolen, dean of natural and health sciences; Michael Marrapodi, dean of inter-institutional affairs and online programs; and William Brennan, interim dean of professional programs.

Brennan has been with Quincy College since September 2012, when he joined the faculty as an instructor teaching courses in management, business, labor law, economics, advertising and other related subjects.

In the past year, Brennan has proven himself to be a committed member of the Quincy College community. He served on the Grade Appeals Committee, NEASC Finance Committee and Institutional Issues Committee. In addition, he developed the proposal for a paid internship program, which was recently funded by College Courses Inc.

His teaching experience includes faculty appointments at Curry College and at Bridgewater State and Bryant universities. He has more than 25 years experience working in management/leadership positions for leading regional, national and international organizations, including the Stratagem Group, Adelphia Communications, Constar International, Stop & Shop, Halliburton/DRESSER and Interstate Brands.

Brennan holds a bachelor's degree in political science from Providence College, a master's degree in public administration from Suffolk University and a master's in applied management from Lesley University. He also completed certification as a Senior Ppofessional in Human Resources (SPHUR).

He is an active member of the business community serving on the South Shore Workforce Investment Board and the South Shore Chamber of Commerce. He has been a trainer for several organizations and a contributor to PaperAge Magazine, a national industry publication. In addition, he has served as a youth coach in soccer, baseball and hockey and as assistant coach for the Providence College Women’s Hockey Team. Brennan is also a former player on the New England Senior Hockey League.

Van Joolen joins Quincy College after a distinguished career as a Naval officer and permanent military professor at the United States Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Md.

A community college graduate himself, he holds an associate's in natural sciences from Pasadena City College, a bachelor's degre in chemical engineering from the University of California, San Diego; a master's in strategic planning from the Army War College, in Carlisle, Pa.; a second master's in applied mathematics from the Navy Postgraduate School, in Monterey, Calif.; and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics, also from the Navy Postgraduate School.

During his Naval career, which included significant experience on surface warships as well as at the United States Naval Academy, Captain van Joolen served as executive officer on the USS Juneau and as chief engineer on the USS Cayuga. He has received several academic and military awards, including the W. Randolph Award for Excellence in Mathematics; the Meritorious Service Medal for excellence in training and retention of personnel, while an officer on the USS Juneau; and a Navy Commendation Medal for excellence and safe plant operations under extreme environmental conditions, while chief engineer on the USS Cayuga. While at the U.S. Naval Academy, he was nominated three times for the Military Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award. The title of his doctoral dissertation was "Application of Higdon Non-Reflecting Boundary Conditions to Shallow Water Models."

He has presented several times at conferences of the Mathematical Association of America and at the Military Operations Research Symposium on "Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on the Battlefields of 2020"; and he published a number of scholarly articles and papers on topics such as the application and effect on high-order Higdon boundary conditions.

Marrapodi has been an educator and senior leader in education for nearly 20 years. He has 10 years of teaching and administrative experience working with new and established online programs. His experience in training faculty to incorporate technology to enhance teaching and learning, as well as his work in curriculum development, qualitative and quantitative analysis and statistics in online settings, will help Quincy College as it builds its online presence in the education community.

He holds a Bachelor of Sacred Music degree from Northeastern Bible College in Essex Falls, N.J.; a Master of Education in music education from The College of New Jersey in Ewing, N.J.; and a Doctorate in Education in education leadership from Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I.

During his career, Marrapodi has served as headmaster, principal or director of development for several private Christian schools. He has been or is an online faculty member for Argosy University, the University of Phoenix (School of Advanced Studies) and Capella University. He has also been a faculty member at the New England College of Business, Dean College, Boston Baptist College and Northeastern Bible College. These experiences have led him to become familiar with many different types of instructional software prevalent in the higher education community today.

He has presented at conferences and workshops on topics such as "Transformational Leadership," "Successful Teaching in a Technological World," "Understanding by Design/Concept Based Curriculum," "Shared Leadership," "‘Who Moved My Cheese’: Implications for Teaching and Learning," "Professional Staff Development" and a number of other education-related topics.

Quincy College Names Three New Deans

August 25, 2014

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY – The city’s community college has hired three new deans to lead various departments.

Quincy College on Thursday announced the appointments of William Brennan as the interim dean of professional programs, Navy Capt. Vincent van Joolen as dean of natural and health sciences and Michael Marrapodi as dean of inter-institutional affairs and online programs.

Brennan has worked for Quincy College since September 2012, when he joined as an instructor teaching courses in management, business, economics, advertising and other subjects. He has also taught at Curry College, Bridgewater State University and Bryant University.

Capt. van Joolen, who has a doctorate degree in applied mathematics from the Navy Postgraduate School in California, previously was a naval officer and military professor at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

Marrapodi, who earned his doctorate in education leadership from Johnson & Wales University in Providence, has 10 years of experience working as a teacher and administrator with new and established online programs.

Quincy College, founded in 1958, is a two-year public school that serves about 4,000 students at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses. The fall semester begins Sept. 3.

Barnes & Noble to operate Quincy College bookstore

August 14, 2014

By Patrick Ronan

PatriotLedger.com

Quincy - Barnes & Noble is preparing to open a new store on the Quincy College campus at Presidents Place by the end of this month.

Earlier this summer, the bookstore chain was awarded the contract to operate the college’s bookstore, previously located in a storefront next to the Hancock Cemetery. The former store, operated by eFollett, closed in late June.

Taggart Boyle, a spokesman for the college, said the new bookstore – to be named Barnes & Noble at Quincy College – will sell text books and merchandise for students, as well as best-seller books and office supplies for the public.

“It’s going to be a resource not only for the college, which is great, but also for the community,” Boyle said Wednesday.

The new college bookstore will be located inside the Galleria At Presidents Place, the downtown plaza that houses Quincy College and more than 20 other tenants, including Harvard Vanguard, Dunkin' Donuts and the Adams National Historical Park Visitor Center.

Presidents Place, owned by Related Beal and Boston Andes Capital, also has a five-story parking garage and it abuts the Ten Faxon apartment complex.

The bookstore is moving into the space formerly used by the college’s student services center, which has been relocated. The previously unused door facing Hancock Street will be one of two entrances into the bookstore, along with the atrium.

Many Barnes & Noble stores sell Starbucks coffee, but the Quincy location won’t because the Dunkin' Donuts in Presidents Place has a no-compete clause in its lease, Boyle said.

Nationally, bookstores have struggled as the popularity of e-books, viewed on digital devices such as Kindle, have surged. Bookstore sales fell by more than 20 percent from 2007 to 2013, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2013, Barnes & Noble announced it would close up to a third of its stores in the next decade.

The only other bookstore in Quincy is New England Comics at 1511 Hancock St., though it sells mostly graphic novels.

Just outside the new Barnes & Noble, a $7.9 million roadway project is underway that is meant to set the stage for a new downtown park tentatively called Adams Green.

On Wednesday, Christopher Walker, a spokesman for Mayor Thomas Koch, clarified the city’s plans to pay for the park, estimated to cost $25 million. Koch, he says, will seek funding through the state’s Infrastructure Investment Incentive Program, or I-Cubed, the approval of which hinges on the city’s ability to generate new tax revenue from its now-stalled downtown redevelopment project.

Walker said new tax revenue from three residential projects proposed downtown – at the former Beth El Temple, the former Central Middle School and at 10 Merrymount Road – can’t be used to secure I-Cubed funding. However, he said the new property taxes could be used to help the city pay back $40 million in debt that it accrued to pay for a new concourse and for other downtown planning purposes.

Quincy College adds Security, Gaming and Gerontology Programs

August 11, 2014

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY – Quincy College has added three new programs that will available to students starting in September.

The college has created an associate degree program in security management and new certificate programs in computer game development and gerontology.

The school said it added the programs in response to a high demand for jobs in these fields.

The three programs will be offered starting in the fall semester, which starts Sept. 3. Class registration information can be found at quincycollege.edu.

The security management degree program aims to prepare students for careers in a variety of jobs in the security industry, including private security, corporate investigations, asset protection, interpersonal communications and human resource management.

In the game development certification program, students will learn how to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer games.

The gerontology program is meant to prepare professionals for careers in human services with a focus on working effectively with elders.

Quincy College, founded in 1958, is a two-year public school that serves about 4,000 students at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses.

Quincy lures tech firms

July 15, 2014

City draws startups like RasLabs, Bluefin Labs with cheaper space

By Jordan Graham
BostonHerald.com

Quincy is throwing its hat into the Massachusetts technology ring, trying to lure growing high tech and life sciences companies — and the coveted jobs they bring with them — to the City of Presidents.

“We’ve really been working hard to put the pieces together to make Quincy more attractive for investment,” said Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch.

Koch said Quincy can be a good fit for companies that need a bit more space than Boston offers, particularly for light manufacturing.

Recently, Quincy sent two economic development officials to a global biotechnology conference in San Diego to pitch Quincy as a good home, and joined the newly created Life Sciences Corridor, a joint effort with Cambridge, Boston, Somerville and Braintree to market the region to companies.

Medical device company RasLabs, a former MassChallenge finalist, unveiled its new office and lab space in Quincy Thursday.

It is moving from Boston’s Innovation District.

“This is a magnificent spot,” RasLabs CEO Eric Sandberg said, referring to the new office. “It was everything we were looking for, there’s room to expand.”

RasLabs had been working out of MassChallenge and looked for office space in the Innovation District, but did not find a good fit.

RasLabs, which makes synthetic muscles, joins Boston Scientific and Bluefin Labs, makers of underwater drones, in Quincy.

Bluefin, which came into the spotlight when its underwater drones were used in the search for the missing Malaysian airliner, was offered tax incentives to move to Quincy, Koch said.

Bluefin CEO and president David Kelly said the company chose Quincy because of a supportive Quincy government as well as “the Fore River Shipyard, which offers water access and ample factory space.”

Similar tax incentives could be used in the future to draw new companies to the city.

“We use any tool or resource we can to help...the economy of our city,” Koch said.

Quincy, where the unemployment rate is just 4.8 percent, according to the state, is still trying to expand its economy.

“For Quincy, or any community, it’s important to do as much as you can to diversify your economy and your commercial base so you’re not relying on one industry sector,” said Dean Rizzo, president of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce.

Still, growing companies need more than just cheaper office space.

Part of Quincy’s effort is creating an attractive ecosystem for companies, as well as a pipeline for future talent.

Quincy College has a new 1,600 square foot biotech lab, funded by the U.S. Department of Labor and the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center.

Koch added: “It’s been a real concerted effort to open our world a little bit.”

Training workers for biotech labs is Mass. program’s goal

July 3, 2014

By Mary Thompson

CNBC



Twenty-seven-year-old Daria Kotowski can barely contain her excitement.

"The gel systems are here," she exclaims, pulling packages containing an orange-looking goo from a cabinet in Quincy College's biotechnology and compliance lab.

The gel systems will be used by students to test the cells they are growing at the Quincy, Massachusetts-based school's lab, a 1,600-square-foot facility created from the former offices of some of the school's administrators who championed the program.

A top student at Quincy, Kotowski will graduate after she completes a three-month summer internship at Takeda Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Having moved from Erie, Pennsylvania, to enroll in the program, she has already lined up interviews for full-time jobs. When Kotowski lands one, the mother of a young son will fulfill the aim of the 3-year-old program.

So instead of training students to enter the field of biotechnology from the research side, Van Dyke created a program that would teach students how to be technicians at a biotechnology company.

This means students not only take courses in biotechnology, chemistry and biochemistry, but classes in technical writing and compliance. This way they can easily step into a biotechnology plant, knowing the rules and regulations they must comply with to make a drug.

"The ideal candidate for us is someone who has been exposed to some of the hands-on laboratory work, the manipulation of the equipment, use of diagnostic tools," said Bill Ciambrone, Shire's head of technical operations at its rare disease hub in Lexington, Massachusetts. "Those are the types of people who are most in demand."

While the Labor Department reported job growth of 288,000 jobs in June, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates job growth for biomanufacturing technicians will be about 10 percent from 2012 to 2022. This should translate into 8,000 new jobs over the decade.

Hundreds of those jobs will be added in Massachusetts, the state with the highest number of biotech jobs per capita, according to Northeastern University's Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy. A survey by the Massachusetts Biotechnology Education Foundation forecasts 393 jobs in biomanufacturing, process development and quality will be added by 2016.

Quincy College expects its one-of-a-kind program, designed with the help of biotechnology companies in the state, will help meet that demand.

"If you're not doing what they need you to do," Van Dyke said referring to the biotech companies. "You're just wasting your time."

Armed with a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor and a $645,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, Van Dyke wasted no time setting up two programs at Quincy College: Both the associates degree program and the certificate program are run in conjunction with the Jewish Vocational Services (JVS).

The certificate program is aimed at adults who have been out of the workforce, or are looking to redirect their careers. They attend refresher courses run by the JVS in math, biology, chemistry and other subjects for 23 weeks before entering Quincy's certificate program where they receive training in the basics of biomanufacturing and compliance.

Technicians work on the front lines of biopharma manufacturing, testing and transferring trillions of cells that are grown to produce proteins the technicians will separate from the cells needed to create the drugs. This process requires hundreds of steps, including constant testing to insure the cells are healthy.

This means technicians are monitoring pH levels and temperature, and testing glucose and lactate levels, among other parameters, all while the cells are growing. What makes Quincy College's program unique is that students receive 480 hours of hands-on training, each with their own cell line. They train on the software the biotech industry uses to monitor the process and train state-of-the-art equipment like bioreactors, where cells can be grown on industrial scale.

Most of the equipment the students use, was either purchased with grant money, or donated by local biotech firms.

"I think one of the most important things with taking these folks from these programs, is that technology changes." said Shire's Ciambrone "And as technology marches on, the skills that are needed change, the equipment they work with changes. What businesses can often do is to work with the schools to create a curriculum that is current with the need."

Understanding the need to stay current, Quincy is training its students on single-use, or disposable equipment that is increasingly being used by biotech companies to grow cells. Van Dyke said it is the only school in the country that has this type of equipment.

There were eight graduates in the first class of the biomanufacturing and compliance program and 10 in the second, which graduated this spring. Van Dyke said all of the first class found jobs and so far three of the 10 in the most recent class are employed. He expects the remaining seven to have jobs by the end of the summer.

There are currently 36 students in the program and thanks, in part, to Van Dyke's enthusiastic recruiting, they expect to have 60 enrolled in the fall. That, Van Dyke said, will mean the program is at capacity. The school wants to keep the classes small so students can work in groups of four in the labs, without tripping over each other.

One of the program's graduates is 25-year-old Alex Wilson. He was hired last year as a technician at Shire's rare disease center. He works four 10 hour shifts a week at the 24/7 plant in Lexington. He also works overtime when he can get it.

"My five-year plan would be to be a lead in my department, my 10-year plan would be to switch departments and go into R&D, or research and development," Wilson told CNBC, his ambition and preparedness evident in his well-scripted answers.

The BLS puts the starting salary for a biomanufacturing technicians like Wilson at $39,750. Shire declined to say what it pays its entry -evel employees, only saying its pay is "competitive" and Shire's employees receive full benefits along with tuition reimbursement.

"They are well compensated, especially in relation to other recent college graduates and in many cases high school or other college graduates," said Ciambrone, who himself started as a technician. "These are really great jobs for people starting out in the workforce."

Daria Kotowski isn't starting out; she is kick-starting her career. Having tried her hand at cosmetology and as a nurse's aide, she's found her comfort zone studying biotech.

"There's so many possibilities with this field," she said. "It's endless really."

Quincy College biotech program to be featured on CNBC

July 3, 2014

By Patriot Ledger Staff

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY – Quincy College’s new biotechnology and compliance program will be featured on the CNBC news network on Thursday.

Crews from CNBC have been on the Quincy College campus this week to gather information about the school’s revitalized biotech and compliance program, which launched last year and is expected to help prepare students for the growing number of jobs in the life sciences industry.

The college’s program, offering associate degrees and certificate training, is based in a new 1,600-square-foot laboratory on the school’s Quincy Center campus.

The biotech program is being highlighted as part of CNBC’s “Where the Jobs Are” series. It will be featured on the CNBC program “Squawk Box” at 6 a.m. Thursday and then on “Nightly Business Report” at 6:30 p.m.

Quincy College is asking people to go on Twitter and tweet #QConCNBC as they’re watching the segments.

The school’s new biotech and compliance lab, in Saville Hall, was paid for with money from a $3 million federal grant. The grant also went toward curriculum development, the purchasing of equipment and supplies, and additions to the faculty.

The program also received a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a state-funded agency.

Sen. Markey: Quincy College grads the perfect snapshot of America

June 2, 2014

More than 330 students picked up their associate’s degrees Saturday during Quincy College’s spring commencement at the Quincy Marriott hotel. Including those not in attendance, about 450 students earned associate’s degrees from the two-year commuter school, which has campuses in Quincy and Plymouth.

By Patrick Ronan
PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY

Prior to enrolling in Quincy College in 2012, Tonya Hendrick-George lived in a homeless shelter with her four children. Two years later, she owns a 3.61 grade-point average, associate’s degree in business management, her family has a home and she’s on a career path.

Tonya Hendrick-George said her turnaround was possible because she was embraced and empowered by Quincy College.

“It was not easy for me, but being at the right college, with the correct staff, in the right season of my life, my future is looking extremely bright,” Hendrick-George said.

Hendrick-George, , a magna cum laude graduate, was one of more than 330 students who picked up their associate’s degrees Saturday during Quincy College’s spring commencement at the Quincy Marriott hotel. Including those not in attendance, about 450 students earned associate’s degrees from the two-year commuter school, which has campuses in Quincy and Plymouth.

Filling the hotel’s ballroom were graduates hailing from dozens of different countries representing a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds. U.S. Sen. Edward Markey, the event’s commencement speaker, said the college’s diversity is a microcosm of America.

Hendrick-George was selected to speak on behalf of the school’s Quincy campus, while David Hawkins, a Mississippi native, was chosen to represent the Plymouth campus. Hawkins, with a degree in criminal justice, said he’s the first member of his family to graduate college.

A corrections officer by trade, Hawkins, married with three children, credited Quincy College’s professors for helping pave the way toward his future goals – getting bachelor’s and master’s degrees, being promoted to captain in his field and working as a college professor.

“I now believe that these goals are attainable for me,” Hawkins said.

Markey, who spoke for about 20 minutes, told Quincy College grads that they are among the luckiest people who ever lived because of the nation they live in and the education opportunities they have. As examples of those who are less fortunate in the world, he pointed to the nearly 300 Nigerian girls abducted by Islamic extremists for pursuing an education, and to Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating for girls' education.

Markey, a Malden native with a bachelor’s and law degrees from Boston College, said he, like many of Quincy College’s students, commuted to school and had to hold a job to pay for his own tuition. Markey, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 37 years before being elected to the Senate last year, worked as an ice cream truck driver in college.

“The harder you work, the luckier you get,” Markey said. “Somehow the prospects keep getting better and better.”

Markey said said he’s proof that the college experience is just as rewarding for commuter students as it as for those living on campus.

He joked: “I’m living proof that you can survive seven years of education in college, living at home with my parents, without severe psychological damage.”

Quincy College - Plymouth “Memorial Day Commemoration”

May 23, 2014

Quincy College held a Memorial Day Commemoration program, as the spring semester drew to a close earlier this month, at the school’s Plymouth campus in Cordage Park.

View the gallery of the Memorial Day Commemoration event on Plymouth campus here.

View the article of the Memorial Day Commemoration event on Quincy campus here.

Quincy College Holds First Annual Memorial Day Commemoration

May 7, 2014

Patriotledger.com

By Nathaniel Weitzer

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Quincy College Veterans Christopher Sawin and Joseph Sparda honor POW and MIA soldiers.

QUINCY -- Police officers, students, veterans and guests filled the conference room at President’s Place in Quincy Center for an early Memorial Day observance.

English professor Aaron Levine, who has taught at the college for 17 years, recounted his uncle’s experience in World War I, his own tour in the Navy during World War II and the difficulties his students are going through after returning from their own tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Mattapan native and business major Jelani Lewis shared some of his combat experience in Afghanistan.

For the past three years, the college has honored veterans with a display of banners throughout campus bearing the names of those who have served.

“We had a spectacular turnout and I think the ceremony was very moving,” said veteran services specialist Chris Sawin, who organized the commemoration. “There’s a big difference between someone seeing a name on a wall, and coming to here these stories about past and current conflicts in person. It’s simply much more powerful of an experience.”

For more information about Quincy College's Military and Veteran Services, please visit their page.

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Students get hands-on biotech training

April 24, 2014

Quincy College offers certificate program

Boston Herald

By Paul Restuccia

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Photo by Tom Fitzgerald

Sybille Cherismo didn’t even know what biomanufacturing was before learning about and enrolling in a new certificate program at Quincy College that is training students for careers in the biotech industry.

“I was studying nursing, so I knew I wanted to be in something in the sciences that helps people,” said Cherismo, 25, of Brockton. “There’s a lot to learn and everything is fast, with new courses every seven weeks.”

Ten students are currently enrolled in the first class of the Biotechnology and Compliance certificate program that started in January. Students take a series of seven-week to 15-week courses three days a week in quality control microbiology and biochemistry quality assurance, and upstream (making of bacteria) and downstream processing (purifying the biosynth­etic), as well as how to comply with FDA requirements.

The students come to the program through a free 23-week college prep program offered by Boston’s JVS that’s targeted to low- and moderate-income individuals. Students in the program’s biotech career pathway took math, science and college readiness classes in the JVS Bridges to College and Careers program to prepare them to enter the certificate program at Quincy College.

Amir Nedjadi, 31, of Brookline, was unemployed and took the JVS college prep program with an eye toward studying biotech.

“I’m glad to be learning again and on the cutting edge of science in a field that helps people and is promising, career-wise,” Nedjadi said.

Quincy College built out a fully equipped lab for the program last year, supported by a $3 million federal grant and $645,000 in state funds, including a recently announced $500,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center for more lab equipment. Local biotech company advisers such as Shire Human Genetic Therapies in Lexington, Xcellerex (G.E. Healthcare) in Marlboro and Takeda Millennium Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge have donated equipment and also helped shape the certificate curriculum.

“What sets this program apart is that students train on state-of-the-art equipment used in the industry today,” said program instructor Isso Bayala, who has worked at AstraZeneca, Wyeth and 
other big pharmaceutical companies. “Hiring our graduates will save them months of training time.”

Students are training on single-use bioreactors, a technology that allows for easy disposal of products without the need for sterile rooms, which also allows companies to change production lines quickly.

“This is the only program in the state that trains students in single-use manufacturing,” said Bruce Van Dyke, chairman of the Biotechnology and Compliance program at Quincy College, who has been a professor at the school for 12 years and before that worked in the biotech industry.

“Companies tell me that when our students come out of this program they will be months ahead of other new hires,” Van Dyke said.

Amos Cordon of Dorchester likes the course so far 
“because it is hands-on.”

“I’m good at math and science and would like to have a career in biotech,” said Cordon, who has worked in the insurance industry for 17 years. “My long-term goal is to get into plant DNA.”

Danny Quinn of Quincy is another older student making a career change.

“I didn’t know anything about biotech, but decided to try something completely out of my comfort zone,” said Quinn, 58, who most 
recently worked for the TSA. “It’s a whole new language to learn, but I’m taking a leap of faith.”

Tuition for the certificate program is $8,000, but most students receive financial aid.

“What’s great is that for $8,000 you can have a career in biotech. Considering what other students are paying for their educations and the debt they are accumulating, this is nothing,” Van Dyke said.

Shamistha Chowdhury, 34, has two children now in school and wants to have a career of her own.

“I have some relatives in the biotech field and I would like to do it too,” said Chowdhury, who lives in Medford. “There’s a lot of studying but I like the work.”

Certificate students will graduate in September and will qualify for entry-level jobs as biomanufacturing lab technicians doing cell culture, purification or quality control. Van Dyke says graduates will earn around $40,000 per year.

And the jobs are out there. A Massachusetts Life Sciences Industry Entry Level Employment Demand report says local companies plan to add 393 new jobs in biopharmaceutical manufacturing by 2016, plus more hires to fill vacated positions.

Students in the Quincy certificate program not only learn the biomanufacturing processes, but will also receive help with cover letters, resume writing, handling interviews and job placement.

“We’re already in touch with recruiters to promote our students and I am starting to put in calls to biotech companies to place them,” Van Dyke said.

The next biotech certification program at Quincy College starts in July with students currently enrolled in the JVS college prep program.

There will be two nine-month programs every year, with a class also starting next January.

This summer, Van Dyke 
will help improve the hands-on training by setting up a state-of-the-art quality control lab with equipment donated by Shire.

“As soon as biotech companies hear about what we’re doing they want to be a part of it,” Van Dyke said.

Quincy College Expands Innovative Biotechnology Program

April 7, 2014

Quincy College is training students for high-tech jobs in pharmaceutical manufacturing through its innovative biotechnology and compliance program.

By Sue Scheible
Patriotledger.com

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4/5/2014 QUINCY –- Temperamental little creatures, those mammalian cells. Not like bacteria, which are so hardy. That’s the challenge for students in the biotechnology and compliance program at Quincy College. Midway through the two-year curriculum, they’re given their own mammalian cell lines.

Their task: keep the fussy cells alive for two weeks in the lab. They have to check on them every other day, make sure they look good, transfer them from one container to another, and adjust the pH and CO2 levels, keeping the cells sterile the whole time. Bruce Van Dyke, chairman of the program, calls it “baby-sitting.”

The students use special techniques and special equipment: biosafety cabinets with sterile environments, cell incubators, inverted microscopes.

Once they succeed, they are a step closer to being ready for the real world – the growing pharmaceutical manufacturing industry in Greater Boston. Mammalian cells produce a protein needed for important drug products. Starting pay in the industry can be near $40,000 a year for trained workers, with bonuses and steady advancement.

Single-use disposable bioreactors are the new technology, the new wave in biomanufacturing, Van Dyke said, and Quincy has the only program in the state that trains students in it.

This all sounded like a good investment to 27-year-old Daria Kotoski of Weymouth, who will graduate in May with an associate degree in biotechnology. Kotoski, who has a son, couldn’t wait to meet her mammalians.

“My favorite part of the program is the tissue culture – you know, getting them going,” she said. “It’s like raising kids. You take care of them; they’re your babies.”

She laughs at the comparison.

Kotoski is one of 38 students in the program, which offers the two-year associate degree and a certificate in biotechnology for displaced workers who need retraining.

“It’s just fascinating,” Kotoski said. “There are so many diseases and issues that millions of people have, and I hope to make a difference in people’s lives.”

She hopes to do research into neurological diseases one day.

The Quincy College program is turning out students who can step right into biomanufacturing jobs without needing on-the-job training. They learn on state-of-the-art equipment in a 1,600-square-foot lab that opened last year in Saville Hall. The program has direct ties with specialty biotech companies like Shire in Lexington and GE-Xcellerex in Marlboro.

The college recently received its third grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, an investment agency in Waltham. About $500,000 in new funds will be used for training more students on the latest single-use biomanufacturing equipment.

“Very high-tech” is how Van Dyke puts it.

“You don’t get this type of skill sets too many places,” he said. “We set up a small version of the industry. Our disposable bioreactors are 3 liters; the ones in the industry are two stories high. But the students train on the same types of reactors and they train for about 10 different jobs.”

Many of the students are in their 20s and trying to build futures: Ephraim Simachew, 29, and Sophanarith Am, 28, of Cambridge; Daniel Bertman, 29, and Daniel Diggins, 22, and Jean-Luc Bellefleur of Quincy; and Kelly Weeks, 23, of Braintree. Simachew works part time as a valet driver. Am was unemployed for a year. Bellefleur sold shoes and was in the military.

Van Dyke, who lives in Squantum, worked in both biotechnology research and industry in California before coming to Massachusetts. He was lured by the chance to develop innovative teaching programs in a rapidly advancing field.

The jobs being trained for involve detailed, tightly controlled work, but the companies rotate workers in different labs to keep it from becoming tedious. The biopharmaceutical field can offer quick advancement, bonuses, financial help with further education, and internships with connections to Boston-area companies.

The college is also working with Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch and the biotech industry to interest biomanufactuing companies in locating in Quincy.











Patriot Ledger OPINION: 3 stories of educating your mind, body and soul

April 4, 2014

patriotledger.com

March 17. 2014

OUR OPINION: 3 stories of educating your mind, body and soul
This week, we offer you three stories of programs where you can go to enrich your mind, body and soul.

The Duxbury Senior Center hosts what it calls the “Lifelong Learning Program.” Though it caters to mature adults, it’s open to anyone who has an interest in learning about culture, history or current events.

We like the thought of people continually striving to learn more about the practical and esoteric world around them. A critical thinker has a curious mind and always seeks to learn more.

This week, we offer you three stories of programs where you can go to enrich your mind, body and soul.

No. 1: Quincy College

Tucked in the center of the city (with a satellite campus in Plymouth), Quincy College is the only municipally-owned college in the commonwealth – and with a new biotech lab, it’s on the cutting edge of education.

Last year, this two-year school opened the Saville Lab as part of its biotechnology and compliance program.

Funded by a $3-million federal grant and a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, its goal is to train students on single-use bio-manufacturing equipment.

Great training for the 21st-century worker.

Last week, Massachusetts Life Sciences gave the school another grant. This time a whopping $500,000.

Such a program can only benefit the broader community in terms of attracting biotech companies to the area – after all they need well-trained employees – and residents who will be prepared to take those jobs.

No. 2: Friends of the Scituate Town Library

We love libraries, each is a gift to the community it serves.

In addition to a plethora of books on just about any topic, libraries offer movies, passes to cultural events and free discussions and workshops.

But what caught our eye this week is a presentation the Friends of the Scituate Library is hosting on swordplay.

Yes, you read that right.

On April 13, the Association for Renaissance and Medieval Swordsmanship will be in town to talk about the history of the sword from the 14th century through modern times.

But this won’t be all talk and no action. The free presentation will include sword fight demonstrations with audience participation.

Nothing makes history come alive quite like a clash of sword on sword. En garde!

No. 3: Self-defense class, Hingham police

Sometimes the best defense is a good offense. And when it comes to preventing crime, education is the key.

That’s why the Hingham police’s free, five-week self-defense class for women is so important.

Using the Rape Aggression Defense program, students will learn how to best protect themselves against an attack.

This is one of those rare instances when we hope the students will never have to put their educations to good use.

Anyone who wants to learn more, may contact Officer Tom Ford at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

We commend the police for being proactive about keeping the greater community safe.

Quincy College gets $500,000 grant

April 4, 2014

patriotledger.com

Quincy College has received a $500,000 grant to benefit the school’s biotechnology and compliance program.

QUINCY 3/13/2014 – Quincy College has received a $500,000 grant to benefit the school’s biotechnology and compliance program.
On Wednesday, the college announced that the grant, from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a quasi-public agency, will help the program continue training students on single-use biomanufacturing equipment used by today’s scientists.

Last summer, the school launched its biotechnology and compliance program by opening a state-of-the-art lab in Saville Hall, part of the college’s Quincy Center campus. Quincy College, the only municipally owned college in the state, is a two-year school serving about 4,600 students at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses.

The new lab was funded by a $3 million federal grant and a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center.

For more information about the college’s biotechnology and compliance program, contact program chairman Bruce Van Dyke at 617-984-1669 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Read the full press release here.

Quincy College’s BTC Program Receives Additional $500,000 Grant from Mass Life Sciences

April 4, 2014

masslifesciences.com

Quincy College has been awarded a $500,000 Capital Grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center. The grant will allow Quincy College’s Biotechnology and Compliance program to continue training its students on the single-use biomanufacturing equipment that is used by today’s biotechnology industry. The College currently offers associate degree and certificate programs in Biotechnology and Compliance. The funds are slated to purchase laboratory supplies and equipment and to assist in furthering curriculum development. 3/12/2014

Read the full press release here.

Quincy College Offers Scheduling Flexibility

February 10, 2014

Quincy College will offer accelerated semesters throughout the year at both its Quincy and Plymouth campuses.

By Lane Lambert, Patriot Ledger
February 7, 2014

Quincy College will offer accelerated semesters – lasting five, seven and 10 weeks each – throughout the year at both its Quincy and Plymouth campuses.

The "flex semesters" are part of the college's plan to provide scheduling flexibility to students who can't commit to the traditional 15-week semesters.

Taggart Boyle, a college spokesman, said a majority of the "flex semester" courses are at night, and that students can take as little as one course per semester. "You can take one five-week class and one 10-week class," Boyle said as an example. "Even if they're overlapping, it allows you to look at our course offerings and your schedule, and see what works best for you."

Five-week semesters will begin in February and April and will include courses in English, government, math, philosophy, psychology and sociology. A seven-week semester will begin in March and include courses in accounting, biology, business, criminal justice, computers, economics, English, history, paralegal and management. The 10-week semesters begin in February and March. They include classes in biology, chemistry, computers, English, English as a second language, history, philosophy, psychology and sociology. Additional flex semester programs will be offered in the summer and fall.

For a complete list of spring programs and to apply for courses, go to www.quincycollege.edu/flex.

Quincy College, founded in 1958, is a two-year school serving approximately 4,600 students at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses. It is the only municipally-owned college in the state. Last summer, the college unveiled its new 1,600-square-foot laboratory in Saville Hall in Quincy Center. The lab serve as the headquarters of the college's new biotechnology and compliance program.

Quincy College Professor to Tweet from White House

February 3, 2014

The Metro West Daily News

A Quincy College professor and Plymouth South High School teacher has been selected to watch tonight's State of the Union address from the White House.

QUINCY--

A Quincy College professor and Plymouth South High School teacher has been selected to watch tonight's State of the Union address from the White House.

Erik Walker, who teaches English part-time at Quincy College and full-time at Plymouth South, is one of a small group of social media enthusiasts from around the country selected to watch President Barack Obama's nationally televised speech from the White House. Walker will be live tweeting during the State of the Union, and he can be followed at @erikmwalker.

Walker's tweet will include the hashtag #SOTUSocial.

Walker, an adjunct faculty member at Quincy College's Plymouth campus for 15 years, was selected as part of a program called White House Socials, which invites social media enthusiasts to document live events at the White House.

Quincy College Professor to Tweet from White House

February 3, 2014

Wicked Local Plymouth

QUINCY--

A Quincy College professor and Plymouth South High School teacher has been selected to watch tonight's State of the Union address from the White House.

Erik Walker, who teaches English part-time at Quincy College and full-time at Plymouth South, is one of a small group of social media enthusiasts from around the country selected to watch President Barack Obama's nationally televised speech from the White House. Walker will be live tweeting during the State of the Union, and he can be followed at @erikmwalker.

Walker's tweet will include the hashtag #SOTUSocial.

Walker, an adjunct faculty member at Quincy College's Plymouth campus for 15 years, was selected as part of a program called White House Socials, which invites social media enthusiasts to document live events at the White House.

Quincy College Professor Tweets from White House

February 3, 2014

Enterprise News via Patriot Ledger
By Patrick Ronan

Erik Walker, an adjunct professor at Quincy College, was among about 100 people chosen to live tweet from the White House during Preisident Obama's State of the Union speech Tuesday.

QUINCY - While most of the nation watched President Barack Obama's State of the Union address from their own homes, a part-time Quincy College professor got to watch from inside Obama's home.

Erik Walker, an adjunct professor at Quincy College and an English teacher at Plymouth South High School, was among about 100 people chosen to live tweet from the White House during Obama's speech Tuesday. Walker's Twitter handle is @erikmwalker.

Walker, an adjunct faculty member at Quincy College's Plymouth campus for 15 years, was selected as part of a program called White House Socials, which invites a variety of social media enthusiasts to document live events at the White House.

Walker tweeted images and anecdotes from his visit to the White House throughout the day Tuesday. He attended a special panel discussion with White House officials after the president's speech.

Walker has been named the teacher of the year at Plymouth South and adjunct of the year at Quincy College. He has received funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the past decade.

Quincy College Professor to Tweet from White House

February 3, 2014

The Patriot Ledger

A Quincy College professor and Plymouth South High School teacher has been selected to watch tonight's State of the Union address from the White House.

QUINCY --

A Quincy College professor and Plymouth South High School teacher has been selected to watch tonight's State of the Union address from the White House. Erik Walker, who teaches English part-time at Quincy College and full-time at Plymouth South, is one of a small group of social media enthusiasts from around the country selected to watch President Barack Obama's nationally televised speech from the White House. Walker will be live tweeting during the State of the Union, and he can be followed at @erikmwalker.

Walker's tweet will include the hashtag #SOTUSocial.

Walker, an adjunct faculty member at Quincy College's Plymouth campus for 15 years, was selected as part of a program called White House Socials, which invites social media enthusiasts to document live events at the White House.

Quincy High Biotech Students Visit Quincy College Lab

December 12, 2013

Patriot Ledger

By Mary Pavlu
December 6, 2013

QUINCY —

Thirteen Quincy High School Biotechnical Engineering students were given the opportunity to visit Quincy College’s new biotechnology lab at Saville Hall.

Students involved with the trip, lead by their teacher, Mr. Howard, are enrolled in the school's "Project Lead by the Way" Biotechnical Engineering course.

Chair of the Biotechnology and Compliance Program, Professor Bruce Van Dyke, spoke to students about the program and the biotechnology industry in Massachusetts, conducted various experiments, and lead students through the recently renovated biotechnology lab.

The tour is one of several initiatives through a partnership with Quincy College and the Quincy High School Biotechnical Engineering Programs. Both were awarded grant funding for equipment, future development, and collaboration between the programs.

Joseph Mercurio Appointed VP for Administration & Finance of Quincy College

November 18, 2013

The Quincy Chamber

Higher Education Administration Visionary Joseph Mercurio Appointed Vice President for Administration & Finance of Quincy College

Quincy College welcomes new Vice President for Administration and Finance, Joseph Mercurio. Mr. Mercurio has considerable experience in Higher Education Administration, having spent 38 years at Boston University, the last sixteen of which as the Executive Vice President.

During his tenure, Mr. Mercurio saw the annual budget at Boston University grow from $89 million to over $2 billion. He was in a leadership position in transforming Boston University from a regional commuter school to a nationally ranked research university with a residential student population. He is also recognized as the man who planned and directed the largest expansion of the Boston University campus. He began his association with Boston University in 1973 as Associate Budget Director and, throughout his career served in positions of increasing responsibility, including as Vice President and Comptroller, Vice President of Business Affairs, Senior Vice President and Executive Vice President.

The Board of Trustees named Mr. Mercurio Executive Vice President in January of 1995. His responsibilities included the direction of all non-academic programs and service and support activities of the University, as well as the University’s planning, business and finance functions, human resource functions, insurance management, intercollegiate sports, government and community relations, enrollment management and various commercial activities with which Boston University is associated. It is worthy of note that Boston University achieved annual surpluses during each year of Mr. Mercurio’s tenure.

Mr. Mercurio presided over and gave direction to the planning and development of new facilities for academic, research laboratories, housing, recreational and commercial use, with a value of almost $2 billion. Many of the University’s projects during this period received national acclaim.

President Peter H. Tsaffaras, J.D., President of Quincy College, said “Joseph Mercurio’s extensive experience in administration, finance and operations as well as policy formulation, matches extraordinarily well with those areas which will be under his purview. In addition, his broad experience in innovative institutional expansion and his entrepreneurial vision will make him an invaluable asset as we plan for the future of Quincy College.”

In accepting this appointment Mr. Mercurio stated “I am excited to be joining the leadership team being assembled by President Tsaffaras as Quincy College continues its important educational mission and continues the pursuit of excellence. Quincy College has been a well-kept secret which we hope to reveal to the entire metropolitan area.”

Mr. Mercurio is a graduate of Boston University, holding a BAS in Business Administration. He is a native of Massachusetts and resides in Cohasset, MA.

BU’s Joseph Mercurio Comes Out of Retirement to Join Quincy College

November 18, 2013

Boston Business Journal

By Mary Moore
November 6, 2013

Joseph Mercurio, who retired in 2011 as executive vice president at Boston University, has joined Quincy College as the school's vice president for administration and finance.

Mercurio had been at BU for 38 years, and spent the last 16 as executive vice president.

In a prepared statement, Mercurio said, "Quincy College has been a well-kept secret which we hope to reveal to the entire metropolitan area.”

While Mercurio was at BU, the university's annual budget at BU grew to more than $2 billion from $89 million and he was part of the team that transformed the university from a regional commuter school into a national research institution.

Under his umbrella as executive vice president, Mercurio was responsible for directing all non-academic programs, service and support activities at BU, as well as the planning, business and finance functions, human resources, intercollegiate sports, government and community relations, enrollment management and more.

“Joseph Mercurio’s extensive experience in administration, finance and operations as well as policy formulation, matches extraordinarily well with those areas which will be under his purview. In addition, his broad experience in innovative institutional expansion and his entrepreneurial vision will make him an invaluable asset as we plan for the future of Quincy College,” said President Peter H. Tsaffaras, J.D., President of Quincy College, in a prepared statement.

Mercurio Appointed as College’s New Vice President

November 18, 2013

WickedLocal.com

Quincy College has welcomed Joseph Mercurio as its new vice president for administration and finance.

Mercurio has considerable experience in higher education administration, having spent 38 years at Boston University, the last 16 as executive vice president. During his tenure, Mercurio saw the annual budget at Boston University grow from $89 million to more than $2 billion. He was leader in transforming Boston University from a regional commuter school to a nationally ranked research university with a residential student population. He is also recognized as the man who planned and directed the largest expansion of the Boston University campus.

He began his association with Boston University in 1973, as associate budget director, and throughout his career served in positions of increasing responsibility, including vice president and comptroller, vice president of business affairs, senior vice president and executive vice president.

The B.U. Board of Trustees named Mercurio to the post of executive vice president in January 1995. His responsibilities included the direction of all non-academic programs and service and support activities of the university, as well as the University’s planning, business, finance and human resource functions, insurance management, intercollegiate sports, government and community relations, enrollment management and various commercial activities with which Boston University is associated. During each year of Mercurio’s tenure, Boston University achieved annual surpluses.

Mercurio presided over and gave direction to the planning and development of new facilities for academics, research laboratories, housing and recreational and commercial uses, with a value of almost $2 billion. Many of the University’s projects during this period received national acclaim.

“Joseph Mercurio’s extensive experience in administration, finance and operations, as well as policy formulation, matches extraordinarily well with those areas which will be under his purview. In addition, his broad experience in innovative institutional expansion and his entrepreneurial vision will make him an invaluable asset as we plan for the future of Quincy College,” Quincy College President Peter H. Tsaffaras said.

In accepting this appointment, Mercurio noted, “I am excited to be joining the leadership team being assembled by President Tsaffaras as Quincy College continues its important educational mission and continues the pursuit of excellence. Quincy College has been a well-kept secret, which we hope to reveal to the entire metropolitan area.”

Mercurio is a Massachusetts native and a graduate of Boston University and now lives in Cohasset.

Joseph Mercurio of Cohasset is New Quincy College Exec

November 18, 2013

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY (11/7/2013) —

Quincy College has hired former Boston University vice president and Cohasset resident Joseph Mercurio to be the school’s new administration and finance chief.

Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras announced Mercurio’s hiring Wednesday. Mercurio left BU in 2011 after 38 years there, including 16 as executive vice president. He will be a vice president at Quincy College.

He succeeds previous Administration and Finance Chief Pushap Kapoor, who retired in January.

Mercurio became BU’s executive VP in 1995, and in the years that followed, he supervised the largest expansion in the school’s history, at both the Charles River campus and the medical school campus. As director of BU’s fundraising campaigns, he raised the university endowment to more than $1 billion.

That “extensive experience” makes Mercurio well-matched for Quincy College, which is planning to consolidate and relocate its classes and offices into the redeveloped Quincy Center, Tsaffaras said.

The college is looking to those plans after spending most of the past decade recovering from mismanagement by a former president and political fractures within the college’s governing board. The board chose Tsaffaras in late 2010 amid those conflicts.

Mercurio said he is excited to join the college’s leadership team. He said the school is “a well-kept secret” of the Greater Boston area.

Mercurio is a BU graduate. Before becoming executive vice president, he rose through the management ranks as associate budget director, assistant vice president and comptroller, vice president for business affairs and senior vice president.

During his years as executive vice president, BU’s annual budget has grown from $89 million to $2 billion.

Director of Library Services Susan Whitehead joins Kingston Public Library Foundation

November 18, 2013

Quincy College's Director of Library Services Susan Whitehead has been invited to become a board member of the Kingston Public Library Foundation. Susan's role on the foundation board will provide an avenue for greater Quincy College visibility with another South Shore community.

Roger White presents at the National Economics Teacher’s Association Convention

November 18, 2013

Roger White, Student Development Specialist and an economics instructor, gave a presentation on "Teaching Microeconomics at the Nano-Level" at the National Economics Teacher's Association convention held Oct. 24th & 25th in Austin, Texas.

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Dean Smales leads workshop on Ethics in Accounting at IMA Collaborative Chapter Meeting

November 18, 2013

Dean of Professional Programs Sandra Smales gave a workshop on Ethics in Accounting at the IMA Collaborative Chapter Meeting on October 16. IMA is the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA), an association for accountants and financial professionals working inside organizations.

Quincy College Honored as a Military Friendly School

September 19, 2013

PatriotLedger.com

QUINCY — Quincy College has again been recognized for its programs that cater to military members and their families.

For the third straight year, Victory Media has named Quincy College to its list of military-friendly schools. The media group, which focuses on issues related to military personnel returning to civilian life, honors colleges, universities and trade schools for welcoming American military members and their families.

Quincy College, one of 1,868 colleges on this year’s list, offers a veterans discount program, allowing veterans to enroll in either liberal arts or professional program classes at reduced rates. Because the discount program isn’t funded by the government, veterans at Quincy College are still eligible for education benefits through the VA.

Advisers at the college also review transcripts and exam scores to help service members transfer credits. It’s difficult for some military personnel to get degrees because they relocate frequently.

Quincy College, founded in 1958, is a two-year school serving about 4,000 students at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses.

MLSC Joins Quincy College for a New Biotechnology Lab

September 17, 2013

Medica.de

Massachusetts Life Sciences Center Joins Quincy College for the Grand Opening of Its New Biotechnology and Compliance Laboratory.

The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program unveiled its new laboratory in Saville Hall on August 21, 2013. The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory will be the main laboratory and educational space for the Biotechnology and Compliance Associate Degree Program and Certificate Program at the College. The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory was built with funding in-part of a $3-million federal grant from the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in the sciences, and a $100,000 grant from the MLSC.

Quincy College Opens New Biotech Lab

September 17, 2013

By: Patrick Ronan
EnterpriseNews.com

Job opportunities for biochemists and biophysicists will increase by 31 percent by 2020, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts.

Quincy College is doing its part to meet the projected need by launching a biotechnology and compliance program at its Quincy Center campus. The college on Wednesday unveiled the 1,600-square-foot laboratory that will serve as the program’s headquarters.

State and city officials joined college leaders for a ribbon-cutting ceremony that marked the lab’s opening.

The new lab “is the culmination of our focus on interaction with both government and private industry to provide education and training for our students that result in employment opportunities,” Quincy College Peter H. Tsaffaras said.

The lab, in Saville Hall, was paid for with money from a $3 million federal grant. The grant will also be put toward curriculum development, the purchasing of equipment and supplies, and additions to the faculty.

The college’s new biotechnology and compliance program, offering associate degrees and certificate training, also got a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a state-funded agency.

To develop the program, the college partnered with several local biotech companies and two schools, Boston University and UMass-Boston.

Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch said the new program can help Quincy as it tries to recruit more businesses in the biotech sector.

“This lab, though it’s a grant directly to Quincy College, has a greater good to the city of Quincy and our economic development,” Koch said.

Quincy College launches New Biotech Program

September 17, 2013

PatriotLedger.com
WickedLocal.com

Quincy College held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday to mark the opening of its new biotechnology lab in Quincy Center.

The 1,600-square foot lab, located inside Saville Hall, was built with a $3 million federal grant. The funding will also go toward curriculum development, new equipment and supplies and new faculty members.

In attendance at Wednesday’s ceremony were Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras, Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch, state Rep. Tackey Chan and Secretary of Housing & Economic Development Gregory Bialecki.

The lab will be used by students in the college’s new Biotechnology & Compliance Program. Boston University and UMass Boston helped Quincy College develop the program.

The $3 million grant was awarded through the federal government’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program. In addition, the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center contributed a $100,000 grant toward the new lab.

Quincy College Opens New Biotech Labs

September 17, 2013

By: Don Seiffert
bizjournals.com

On Wednesday, the brand-new Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program showed off its new, 1,600-square-foot lab headquarters in downtown Quincy.

The lab was built with a $3 million federal grant from the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program, and a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center. According to Taggart Boyle, spokesperson for the college, it occupies renovated space inside of the college’s Saville Hall.

The program is designed to train students for careers in biotech, an area in which employment has grown 12 times faster in the state than all other forms of employment, according to a recent report by industry group MassBIO. In addition to the laboratory, the grant money will also go to curriculum development, purchasing equipment and supplies and hiring of new faculty members for the program.

“The opening of the Biotechnology and Compliance laboratory is the culmination of our focus on interaction with both government and private industry to provide education and training for our students that result in employment opportunities,” said Peter Tsaffaras, president of Quincy College, in a statement.

Quincy College says it will be the first to integrate a virtual lab in its biomanufacturing program, where students can learn to program and operate equipment on-line and in 3D in preparation for hands-on training. The U.S. Department of Labor gave the college $450,000 for the virtual lab.

The college has partnered with a slew of local organizations, including Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lonza Biologics, Xcellerex and Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., a Takeda company, all of which helped develop the program. Educational partners include Boston University and UMass Boston, which will admit biotech students into bachelor degree programs to continue their studies.

Quincy College at the Forefront of Biotechnology and Compliance Training

September 17, 2013

Biospace.com

New Biotechnology and Compliance Laboratory Grand Opening

Quincy, MA (08/21/13) – The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program will unveil its new laboratory in Saville Hall on August 21, 2013. The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory will be the main laboratory and educational space for the Biotechnology and Compliance Associate Degree Program and Certificate Program at the College.

The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory was built with funding in-part of a $3 million federal grant from the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in the sciences, and a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the state-funded agency tasked with implementing the state’s 10-year, $1-billion Life Sciences Initiative, to train students for careers in the biotechnology industry. In addition to the Quincy College laboratory, funds are slated to assist curriculum development, purchasing equipment and supplies, hiring of new faculty members and other changes.

“Supporting innovation propels our economy forward and prepares our citizens for the 21st century global marketplace,” said Governor Deval Patrick. “Our innovation economy relies on a well-educated, well-skilled workforce, and Quincy College’s new Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory will expand opportunity and grow jobs in communities throughout the Commonwealth.”

"The Patrick Administration has developed and implemented a consistent, effective economic strategy that promotes government, business, and academic collaboration to help grow our innovation economy and to create economic opportunity for all,” said Greg Bialecki, Secretary of Housing and Economic Development and Co-Chair of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center Board of Directors. “Quincy College’s new laboratory will ensure continued development of our workforce pipeline in the life sciences sector and is a great example of what this type of active, cross-sector partnerships can achieve."

Quincy College’s federal and state grant awards follow closely on the heels of the City of Quincy’s initiative to bring more life sciences companies into the city, which is well-placed to be an industry hub.

“Quincy College is standing at the forefront of a great emerging sector of our economy with this Biotechnology lab, it is a great testament to the College's commitment to providing educational opportunity in fields that are in the heart of our future,” said Thomas P. Koch, Mayor of the City of Quincy.

Following industry trends, the College’s Biotechnology and Compliance Program will prepare students with the skills required to immediately enter the biomanufacturing industry in areas of the biotech sector where there is a pressing need for workers. Furthermore, Quincy College will be the first college to integrate a virtual lab in its biomanufacturing program. This innovative on-campus training was funded in part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance initiative federal grant in which the United States Department of Labor gave the college $450,000 to develop virtual single-use biomanufacturing labs. Students will learn to program and operate the equipment on-line in preparation for hands-on training. There will be built-in breakdown scenarios where the student will need to apply problem solving skills as well as exams to test their knowledge. Additionally, all equipment images will be in 3D to enable students to better grasp their complexity.

“The opening of the Biotechnology and Compliance laboratory is the culmination of our focus on interaction with both government and private industry to provide education and training for our students that result in employment opportunities,” said Peter H. Tsaffaras, J.D., President of Quincy College.

The renovated laboratories at Quincy College have been updated with new equipment that accommodates training in the emerging single-use biomanufacturing technology as well as the traditional technology. Partnerships with public workforce leaders such as the Jewish Vocational Services, South Shore Workforce Investment Board, South Coastal Career Development Administration, Boston Private Industry Council, and Boston, Quincy, and Plymouth One Stop Career Centers will address issues such as student barriers to education, including financing, college entrance skills, transportation, and English language acquisition. Other educational institutions that have partnered with Quincy College, namely Boston University and UMass Boston, will admit biotech students into bachelor degree programs to continue their studies.

“Congratulations to Quincy College on the grand opening of its new laboratory,” said Dr. Susan Windham-Bannister, Ph.D., President & CEO of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center. “Institutions like Quincy College play major roles in training the next generation of our state’s life sciences workforce, and they ensure that training for innovation economy jobs is inclusive and available all across the state. A key strategy of the Life Sciences Center is to use our capital dollars to enable the creation of unique resources that are available to the Massachusetts life sciences community, and Quincy College’s new facility is a great example of that.”

As part of the grants, Quincy College has partnered with industry leaders and workforce developers in an effort to further market the College’s biotechnology programs, recruit students, and assist in placing students in internships and hiring program graduates. Key industry stakeholders include the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the Massachusetts Biotechnology Education (MassBioEd) Foundation, Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lonza Biologics, Xcellerex (a GE company), and Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (a Takeda Company). The College’s biotechnology and compliance training program was designed in conjunction with these industry advisors to ensure that program graduates make a smooth transition into the workforce.

“This is an exciting day for Quincy College. This state-of-the-art laboratory will help the College further its commitment to preparing students for success in the biotech industry,” said U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren. “I’m pleased grants from the U.S. Department of Labor and the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center helped make this effort possible. This is a great example of how investments in education can support opportunities for students and strengthen Massachusetts' position as a global leader in life sciences, biotech research and the innovation economy.”

“Massachusetts is on the cutting edge of biotechnology research and development, and Quincy College's new Biotechnology and Compliance Laboratory will be a biotech beacon for innovation and excellence,” said U.S. Senator Ed Markey. “Students will receive state-of-the-art training, and Massachusetts companies will benefit from highly-skilled workers who will fuel an industry that is making huge strides in treatment for debilitating diseases. I applaud Quincy College and the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center for their commitment to continuing the Bay State's leadership in the biotech sector."

“Massachusetts continues to grow as a biotechnology hub, and with this initiative Quincy College offers an incredible, well-timed opportunity to those from Quincy and the South Shore to enter this exciting field,” said Massachusetts State Senator John F. Keenan.

“This program and laboratory brings Quincy College into the 21st Century in educating students in an additional field to compete in today’s job market,” said Massachusetts State Representative Tackey Chan.

For more information about the Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program, and how to enroll, contact Bruce Van Dyke, Chair of the Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program at 617.984.1669 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Founded in 1958, Quincy College is a two-year, municipally affiliated college serving approximately 4,600 students at campuses located in Quincy and Plymouth, Massachusetts. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, and is licensed by the Board of Higher Education of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to grant the degrees of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science. The college offers 31 associate degree programs and 12 certificate programs in a variety of disciplines, including those within Liberal Arts, Natural Science & Health Sciences, Professional Programs, and Nursing. The college draws a diversity of students from the greater Boston area as well as over 100 countries around the world. More information can be found online at http://www.quincycollege.edu.

Bruce Van Dyke
Chair: Biotechnology and Compliance
Quincy College Academic Division of Natural and Health Sciences
24 Saville Avenue, Quincy, MA 02169
Telephone: 617.984.1669
Fax: 617.471.3989
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Quincy Biotech Lab has Grand Opening

September 17, 2013

By: Chris Reidy
Boston.com

The Quincy College Biotechnology & Compliance Program has unveiled its new laboratory in Saville Hall, and the lab will be the main laboratory and educational space for the Biotechnology and Compliance Associate Degree Program and Certificate Program at the College.

Among the funding the lab received was a $100,000 grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the state-funded agency tasked with implementing the state’s 10-year, $1-billion Life Sciences Initiative.

A press release about the unveiling ceremony included a statement from Governor Deval Patrick.

“Supporting innovation propels our economy forward and prepares our citizens for the 21st century global marketplace,” Patrick said. “Our innovation economy relies on a well-educated, well-skilled workforce, and Quincy College’s new Biotechnology & Compliance Laboratory will expand opportunity and grow jobs in communities throughout the Commonwealth.”

Quincy College’s federal and state grant awards follow closely on the heels of the City of Quincy’s initiative to bring more life sciences companies into the city.

“Quincy College is standing at the forefront of a great emerging sector of our economy with this Biotechnology lab, it is a great testament to the College’s commitment to providing educational opportunity in fields that are in the heart of our future,” Quincy Mayor Thomas P. Koch said in a statement.

Quincy College ends it with some laughs

June 3, 2013

As he spoke at Quincy College’s spring commencement Saturday, college President Peter Tsaffaras said the degrees the graduates would soon receive were much more than just a piece of paper. “It is my firm belief that education is a passport that allows you to travel through to reach your achievements,” Tsaffaras said. “Today, I am proud to say, you have earned that passport.” Tsaffaras’ message was particularly fitting for the nearly 300 graduates sitting before him Saturday, considering the school’s sizable international population representing more than 120 countries. Flags from many of those countries were on display at commencement, which was held in the Boston Marriott Quincy ballroom. Leyla Kaiser, who is from Germany and currently living in Scituate, was ready to close one chapter of his life and move on to another. “I’m excited – it’s my first ceremony,” said Kaiser, who graduated with an associate degree in English. “I’m proud of myself. I’m going to Bridgewater State University next fall to continue my studies.” Commencement speaker Steve Sweeney, an entertainer and comedian, brought a light-hearted touch to the ceremony. He also reminded the graduates that their contributions to the world, no matter how small, are significant and have an impact. “A small difference turns into a big difference,” said Sweeney, a Quincy resident who teaches creative writing at the college. “If you give back, you’re going to have a meaningful, fun life. You’re going to look back and say, ‘I didn’t waste it.’ ”
Eryn Carlson may be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

View the Commencement photos here!»

Life Sciences Center awards $9.35M in grants

April 8, 2013

By: Ira Kantor
BostonHerald.com

The Massachusetts Life Sciences Center today announced more than $9.35 million in grants to support life-sciences-related capital projects in the Greater Boston region.

Boston Children’s Hospital will receive $4 million and another $5 million will go to Harvard Medical School to fund major lab renovation projects. The MLSC will also award grants to Bunker Hill Community College, Quincy College and Regis College for projects related to life sciences training and education.

Through the MLSC, Massachusetts is investing $1 billion over 10 years in the state’s life sciences sector, officials said.

The $4 million grant awarded to Boston Children’s Hospital will help build the Children’s Center for Cell Therapy and support new equipment and facility renovation that will allow additional cell culturing facilities and a robotics area designed to perform highly specialized chemical screening on stem cells, officials said. The CCCT will be a specialized center focused on developing novel stem cell therapies for untreatable or incurable diseases.

With its $5 million grant, Harvard Medical School plans to create a Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology, which is designed to provide better clinical trial information in the drug development process.

Bunker Hill Community College will receive $200,000 to support the expansion of its biotechnology program, while Quincy College received $100,000 to develop its new Certificate of Science program in biotechnology and compliance as well as purchase new equipment for biomanufacturing.

Regis College was awarded $50,000 to allow the college to “develop an analysis of needed resources and their implementation in order to maintain Regis’ cutting edge education in the life sciences,” officials said.

Quincy College receives biotech grant

February 9, 2013

By: Jessica Bartlett
Boston.com
Quincy College has received a $100,000 grant through the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to help train students in biotechnology.

The grant complements a $3 million federal grant in October 2012 and will help the college launch a biotechnology certificate program this fall. According to a release, the $100,000 will help the school develop curricula, renovate laboratories, and hire faculty. “These funds will allow us to purchase equipment and supplies that will help us train our students in the fine art of biomanufacturing and prepare them for direct entry into the workforce,” said Laura Corina, dean of natural and health sciences. The program is occurring alongside a city initiative to bring biotech companies into the city.

This story is from BostonGlobe.com, the only place for complete digital access to the Globe.

Quincy College hosts Michael Dukakis for discussion

December 10, 2012

By: Jessica Bartlett
Boston.com
Quincy College hosted former Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis Thursday at the Crane Public Library.

Quincy College President Peter H. Tsaffaras presented Governor Dukakis with the "Distinguished Speaker" award for his outstanding work and accomplishments in government, and dedication to the advancement of higher education at Quincy College.

“We are excited to have been able to bring such a distinguished national figure to Quincy College,” said Dr. Henry Rubin, Dean of Liberal Arts at Quincy College. "Through events such as this, we are creating a public space where students and the citizens of the South Shore can engage in the civic discourse that is fundamental to a healthy democracy."

Quincy College receives $2,000 security grant

November 20, 2012

By: Jessica Bartlett
Boston.com
Quincy College has received $2,000 in a “School Security Grant” through the office of Norfolk District Attorney Michael Morrissey.

Part of the second annual School Safety Grant program, the grant enables the district attorney’s office to use seized drug money into programs that make schools in Norfolk County safer.

“Our schools need to be safe places, places of refuge in order to be effective places of learning,” Morrissey said. “Taking money that was forfeited by drug dealers and thugs and making capital improvements to the public schools in Norfolk County that make them safer and more secure – I consider that an excellent use of that money.”

Last year alone, Morrissey’s office gave out $21,000 for matching grants of up to $3,000 each. This year, the office offered direct grants to area schools.

Quincy College applied for the grant money, which will be used for door locking mechanisms that better control who is entering its buildings.

“We share with District Attorney Morrissey a commitment to ensuring the safety and security of the College for the several thousand students who come here every day seeking a safe and secure environment in which to learn and improve themselves,” said college President Peter H. Tsaffaras in a release. “We greatly appreciate this grant as it helps us further our ongoing efforts to enhance campus safety, and we look forward to working with District Attorney Morrissey’s office in the future on items of mutual importance.“

Quincy College isn’t the first school in the city to receive improvements from such funds.

In October, Morrissey awarded $2,000 to the Broad Meadows Middle School, Lincoln Hancock, and Squantum Elementary Schools for security cameras.

Last year, the district attorney’s office also funded $3,000 of a $6,500 project to install security cameras for external surveillance at Clifford Marshall and Snug Harbor elementary schools as well as at Sterling, Atlantic, and Point Webster middle schools.

According to a release, all grants were drawn on funds seized during narcotics trafficking investigations. Money was subsequently forfeited by drug dealers during court proceedings.

Quincy College program focuses on integrity

November 8, 2012

By Jessica Bartlett
Boston.com

Quincy College on Wednesday hosted a presentation and book signing by Dr. David Callahan, author of "The Cheating Culture: What More Americans are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead."

His text is the primary text of this year's Quincy College Common Reader Project 2012-2013, in which the college picks one book for the entire campus to read.

In addition to the keynote presentation by the author, each semester there are events, such as brown-bag lunch discussions, and in-class assignments which further integrate the Common Reader Project into all facets of the community.

According to college officials, the purpose of the program is to encourage academic discussion and intellectual engagement surrounding a specific topic each year. This year's topic is integrity.

“We are pleased to have David Callahan give the inaugural lecture for the Common Reader program. His book has helped our first year students and the entire college community to articulate what a culture of integrity, at Quincy and beyond, should look like,” says Dr. Henry Rubin, Dean of Liberal Arts at Quincy College.

Dr. David Callahan is co-founder of Demos, a public policy institute based in New York City where he is a Senior Fellow. His book inspired the website CheatingCulture.com.

Since publishing "The Cheating Culture," David has appeared at colleges and universities around the country to discuss issues of ethics and academic integrity. He has also spoken to numerous business groups and appeared on dozens of television and radio programs to comment on high-profile scandals in sports, business, and academia.

Additional information about David and his work can be found at http://www.cheatingculture.com.

Quincy College gets $2.9M for biotechnology training

September 20, 2012

By Jack Encarnacao
The Patriot Ledger

Quincy College has been awarded a $2.9 million federal grant to train students in the biotechnology industry.

U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda L. Solis announced Wednesday $500 million in grants to 54 community colleges and universities around the country for the development and expansion of training programs.

Quincy College received $2,995,441 for its biotechnology and compliance program.

The school will offer an associate of science program in biotechnology and compliance and a one-year certification program in biotechnology and compliance.

According to the college’s federal application, the program will integrate virtual laboratories into an evidence-based, blended-learning approach.

It will combine training on traditional manufacturing technology with emerging, in-demand technology.

Program partners from the biotechnology industry will provide paid internships to program students in the field.

“The resulting program credentials will meet the Boston area’s growing demand for specialized middle-skills technicians, as well as the area’s need for jobs for displaced workers,” the application reads.

The funding stems from the federal Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program, which was authorized in 2009.

The 2010 Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act included $2 billion over four years to fund the program.

The program provides eligible institutions with money to expand and improve education and career training programs for employment in high-wage, high-skill occupations.

Business and math instructor Walter Correa retires from teaching after a long and illustrious career

September 12, 2012

After graduating from Plymouth High School as Vice President of the class of 1948, Walter Correa worked at Plymouth Cordage Company from 1950 to 1957.

He worked as a laborer in all departments of the mill and the last couple of years he worked in the office. Almost 50 years later he would return to the Plymouth Cordage Company buildings to teach at Quincy College Plymouth.

Correa earned an undergrad degree from Boston University at the age of 43 and a Master of Education degree at Suffolk University 2 years later. He taught at Plymouth Carver High from 1973 to 1985, was Town Accountant in Carver for 3 years, and returned to Plymouth North High School from 1994 to 2006 as a substitute teacher. While there, he business-managed six musical productions as well as drama directing The Music Man. He has conducted a tax accounting business licensed by the IRS for 60 years and is also a licensed insurance broker with 57 years of service.

He taught at Cape Cod Community College for 22 years evenings and taught at Bridgewater State College for 6 years. Since 2006, he has taught business and math courses at Quincy College, which he states is his “favorite educational institution”. He has also been a tutor at QC.

He has 4 children, 6 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild. He has been the organist for the Freemasons for 33 years, a volunteer at his daughter's first grade class in Halifax, a volunteer usher for the Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestra, and head lector at St. Mary Church in North Plymouth.
Correa is the embodiment of the saying “Education is the passport that allows one to travel through and navigate our society.” He has done so much for so many people, and we are truly in awe of his accomplishments and service. He will definitely be missed at Quincy College.

Quincy College, Senior Center partner in programs at new Senior Center

August 17, 2012

By Rich Harbert
Wicked Local Plymouth

It started with a collaboration to determine the future needs of local senior citizens.

It has quickly evolved into a partnership that will pair college students and retirees in a lifelong learning environment.

Once the new senior center opens at 44 Nook Road in December, Quincy College hopes to begin holding regular classes in a lecture room just off the main entrance.

The college is exploring a plan to offer classes that seniors can audit for no credit. The college also expects to offer a variety of full credit courses that will allow students in geriatric courses to interact with seniors.

The still-evolving partnership began earlier this year when students in Professor Kenneth Texeira’s psychology class designed and implemented a four-page survey to collect information on the needs and interests of senior citizens and caregivers.

The survey, sponsored by the Friends of the Plymouth Council on Aging and the Council, itself, was mailed to a random sample of Plymouth residents age 50 and older in hopes of maximizing use of the new senior center.

The survey asked residents to indicate their preferences for a variety of activities, from fitness and social recreation to arts and crafts and technology lessons, from health and wellness and support groups to continuing education and financial and legal consultation.

Texeira’s students mailed 5,000 surveys to residents over the summer. More than 1,100 residents responded. Another 150 or so interested residents completed surveys online.

Director of Elder Affairs Conni DiLego said the survey will help the senior center earn accreditation from the National Council on Aging. That accreditation would raise the standards of offerings and help the center secure grants in the future.

Stacks of responses sit in Texeira’s office awaiting final tabulations and assessment, but the preliminary results suggest a strong interest in continuing education.

The Council on Aging expects to meet some of that need through collaboration with students and teachers at the adjacent Plymouth North High School. The partnership with Quincy College will provide additional offerings.

Texeira and DiLego are working on a series of symposia on topics of special interest to seniors. Topics in the series will include elder abuse, grief and bereavement, late-developing alcoholism and bullying. Texeira said the college is exploring general education course offerings that seniors could attend without having to take tests.

Students enrolled in the college would benefit from working side by side with seniors.

Texeira said it is possible the college might also extend course openings to students at Plymouth North High School as well.

Not everyone is enamored with the plans.

DiLego is catching some heat from seniors for designating the lecture hall on the main floor of the new senior center.

The room had originally been designed as a billiards room, but she said consultations with other centers in the area indicate billiards tables look nice, but are largely underutilized. The Council currently plans to place a foosball table and a smaller billiards table in a room in the basement of the building instead.

There are currently about 12,000 people 60 or older living in Plymouth.

The Senior Center in Cordage Park gets about 1,000 visits a week from approximately 500 individuals. DiLego expects those numbers to double within three months of the opening of the new center.

Read the article at Wicked Local Plymouth»

QC Biotechnology Program on QATV

July 27, 2012

Bruce Van Dyke, Chair of Biotechnology and Compliance at Quincy College, talks about the college's new program and its collaboration with the City of Quincy in attracting new biotechnology companies to Quincy.

Click here to hear the interview.

Certificate programs increasing in popularity

May 6, 2012

By Sarah Shemkus

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Yumeri Gonzalez got the phone call at 3:45 p.m. All she had to do was reshuffle her work schedule, arrange for child care, and fight traffic to make it to Salem State University by 6 p.m., and she would get a seat in the medical assistant program for which she had been wait listed.

Gonazlez, 31, made it. Now, six months later, she is working as a medical assistant in a pediatric office in Malden. The certificate she earned at Salem State allowed her to advance from her former job as a medical office clerk and increase her pay by almost $10,000 per year.

“I enjoy it more,’’ she said. “I’m helping and working with the patients more closely - and the money is better.’’

Health care is just one of several fields in which short-term certificate programs can help workers establish or advance careers. More schools, from community colleges to elite private universities, are offering certificate programs, with the most popular preparing students for work in growing fields such health care, elder care, and specialized Web design.

Harvard University Extension School, for example, started offering certificate courses for the first time last fall. Interest has been strongest so far in the strategic management certificate, a business-focused program that offers classes in economics, dealing with crisis and conflict, and team management, said Michael Shinagel, extension school dean.

Also popular, he said, are the sustainability certificate, which teaches students to design and implement environmentally friendly practices, and the Web technologies program, which offers hands-on classes in website development.

“The certificates were created in response to interest from students who didn’t need a full degree program,’’ Shinagel said.

Certificate programs have become more popular in recent years because they offer a way to advance skills and careers without spending the time and money to obtain a degree. While a bachelor’s degree typically takes at least four years to earn, and an associate’s degree at least two, certificate programs can often be completed in a year or less.

The cost is lower too. At Salem State, for example, one year in a full-time degree program costs $7,700; complete certificate programs can cost as little as $1,000.

A certificate, of course, is not equivalent to a degree, and employers may still prefer an associate’s, bachelor’s, or graduate degree. But certificate programs are excellent options for people with jobs and families who want to take a first step toward a degree or learn specific skills to further their careers.

“A certificate program really helps with career enhancement,’’ said Philip DiSalvio, dean of University College at University of Massachusetts Boston. “It’s a fairly easy way to get the knowledge.’’

In addition, certificate programs are often attuned to changes in the job market and geared toward industries with strong demand for workers. In fall 2013, pending approval by the Board of Governors, Quincy College is adding a new certificate program in biotechnology and compliance, to help meet the workforce needs of growing biomedical and pharmaceutical industries.

“We’re always looking for the next certificates,’’ said school spokesman Taggart Boyle. “We keep up with the market trends.’’

The program will include laboratory classes in life and chemical sciences, as well as training in biomanufacturing and industry practices. Graduates can find jobs as manufacturing, quality control, or instrumentation technicians, according to the school.

Programs in health care, which seems to always have openings for qualified candidates, are perennially popular, said Andrea Swirka, associate director of professional and community enrichment programs at Salem State. She pointed to the college’s clinical medical assistant program - which Gonzalez attended - as well as courses training phlebotomists, who draw blood, and pharmacy technicians. The courses are generally at or near capacity.

“It’s because that’s where the jobs are,’’ said Swirka. “There are jobs opening up in nursing homes and hospitals and physicians groups, and that’s just going to keep increasing.’’

Online programs, which give students greater flexibility and more options, are also becoming common. UMass Boston offers 23 online certificate programs, up from 17 five years ago.

With the growth in the elderly population, programs in gerontology are “very big,’’ said UMass Boston’s DiSalvio. The school offers two undergraduate certificates and two graduate certificates in specialties related to gerontology, all available online.

The undergraduate certificates prepare students for jobs such as case management or admissions at nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care agencies. The graduate certificates offer specialized training for nurses and others already working with aging populations.

The university has also seen strong interest in its online program in instructional technology design, DiSalvio said. The program teaches students to create interactive, multimedia teaching tools and develop curriculum - skills that are in growing demand as online education becomes more mainstream.

Connecticut resident Ken Carlson enrolled in the program as a way to combine his interest in education with his experience as a graphic designer, and take his career in a new direction. He had considered a more traditional graduate program, but realized it would be hard to work around the demands of his job as a graphic designer at a pharmaceutical company.

Carlson has completed three of five courses required for the certificate, and already finds his new knowledge useful at his job, where he is helping build internal training modules. When he finishes, he intends to continue on to the university’s master’s program in instructional design. “The trend in corporate America and in education systems is definitely going online,’’ he said.

Across the board, college officials agreed, it is pragmatism that drives interest in certificate programs, as students seek out practical instruction in fields with promising futures.

That’s true for Gonzalez, the medical assistant. Beyond the professional satisfaction and improved earnings, the Malden resident is also less anxious about her career prospects.

“I am more marketable now,’’ she said. “There are medical assistant jobs everywhere. I can pretty much work anywhere.’’

Quincy College’s Tsaffaras poised to take the plunge, again

February 26, 2012

By Jessica Bartlett, Town correspondent

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Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras will participate in this year’s Jordan Hospital Polar Plunge, taking place next Saturday at noon at Plymouth Beach.

This will be the third time in two years that the Quincy College president will participate in a plunge for charity. Tsaffaras has participated in the John Hancock Birthday Polar Plunge at Wollaston Beach in Quincy two years in a row, most recently last month.

This will be his first dive in to benefit the Jordan Hospital Club Cancer Center. For more information, visit http://www.jordanspolarplunge.com.

Quincy College: Focused on Teaching & Learning, One Student at a Time

January 26, 2012

By Peter H. Tsaffaras, President of Quincy College
The Quincy Sun - January 26, 2012

As the new semester begins, Quincy College is on the move, both literally and figuratively. The College is moving out of Temple Hall and Newport Hall and into President’s Place in downtown Quincy (1250 Hancock Street), as well as continuing to expand our Plymouth campus. Beginning last week and continuing through the end of July, these changes will make additional space available for classrooms and labs in Saville Hall, which will now become home to the Academic Division of Natural & Health Sciences. At the same time, we are working with the Street Works team to build a new facility for Quincy College in the new Quincy Center for occupancy in the summer or fall of 2016.

In addition, the Plymouth campus is continuously expanding to meet the needs of a growing student body in Plymouth County. We have coordinated with UMASS Boston to utilize space and classrooms at their campus in Cordage Park in Plymouth, which is contiguous to ours. Recently added facilities include new offices, bright classrooms, a state of the art science lab, and new nursing labs.

As important as these brick and mortar improvements are, and they are important, Quincy College is definitely on the move in a more figurative sense. As you may be aware, at Quincy College our motto is, “Focused on Teaching & Learning, One Student at a Time.” As such, everything that we do is focused upon teaching and learning and the primacy of the teaching/learning relationship. During the last year we have oriented the entire institution in support of furthering this teaching and learning relationship. In these economic times, when many of our peer institutions are cutting labor costs, Quincy College has increased the size of the full-time faculty by approximately 20%. At the same time, we have reached out to part-time faculty by increasing their salary to more competitive levels and incorporating them more fully into the academic divisions in which they teach. We have dramatically upgraded the support and technology in the classroom, providing full-time faculty with new laptop computers to improve the teaching experience. Each of the four academic divisions is headed by a Dean who possesses an earned doctorate and all of whom spend time teaching in the classroom each week. We have increased the size of the library staff by 50%, extended the hours that our libraries are open to our students, and built a totally new full-service library on the Plymouth campus.

In concentrating on teaching and learning, Quincy College’s emphasis is our students. We have increased the technology available to our students on campus as well as from home. We have implemented online registration, expanded international student services, re instituted an athletics program, and increased student activities and support services. In addition, we have created a position of Director of Military and Veteran’s Services to reach out to our veterans and their dependents.

None of these positive changes could occur without the support and cooperation of countless individuals both within the institution and in the community. The Board of Governors, under the leadership of Chairman William S. Grindlay, is second to none in terms of their positive attitude and commitment to Quincy College. Further, since the day I took office Mayor Thomas Koch’s sole concern has been how the city government can be of assistance to the College. The same goes for the members of the City Council who, both individually and as a group, have been very supportive of our efforts.
Enrollment is strong and continues to grow each semester. Today, we have approximately 4,600 students by headcount, which equals approximately 3,100 full time students. As Quincy College continues to grow, we will remain focused on teaching and learning by updating our academic offerings, developing new academic programs, and increasing student engagement and retention. I welcome you to take a class with our dedicated faculty and discover why students choose Quincy College for a high quality, affordable education. Here at Quincy College people often hear me say, “Education is the passport that allows one to travel through and navigate our society.” I am proud to say that now, more than ever, Quincy College is here to assist people in earning that passport.

6th annual John Hancock Birthday Plunge

January 21, 2012

Even with weather in the low 20s and snow on the ground, locals made it to Wollaston Beach in Quincy Saturday, where they participated in the sixth annual John Hancock Polar Plunge.

By: Jessica Bartlett
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This was the second consecutive year President Tsaffaras braved the elements and took the polar plunge which benefits Interfaith Social Services. If you have not already done so, there’s plenty of time to pledge a contribution to Interfaith Social Services on his behalf as a swimmer. You can make a contribution thru January 31 by sending your contribution to Donna Brugman in Room 106 in the Saville Building. Interfaith Social Services is very gracious and appreciative for the contributions made by the Quincy College community.

Click here to view photos from the 6th Annual John Hancock Birthday Plunge.

Quincy College president making his mark

November 10, 2011

First-year Quincy College president Peter Tsaffaras has made himself a big man on campus by showing up big time.

By: Robert Knox
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First-year Quincy College president Peter Tsaffaras has made himself a big man on campus by showing up big time. After taking the college’s top job in January, the former state policy maker began going to the school gym, talked one-on-one to teachers, and held “president unplugged’’ sessions to which all college community members are invited.

Being visible on campus works two ways. Not only is the new president seen, he sees.

On his way to a wellness program at the school fitness center, Tsaffaras noticed students lining up in front of the school library, waiting for the doors to open at 8 a.m. He learned the line was fed by their need to use the library’s printer before going to their early morning classes.

How to improve the college experience for his students? Open the library a half-hour earlier. They can now print out their work and get to their classes on time.

A community college awarding two-year degrees, with an enrollment of nearly 4,700 students, Quincy College chose Tsaffaras, a former governing board member, after a long and controversial search. After another candidate turned down the job because of the board’s divisions, a revamped board offered Tsaffaras a shot.

As a deputy commissioner for the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, Tsaffaras had the opportunity to observe “about 100 presidents close up. I use something every day that I learned,’’ he said in a recent interview at his office in a building on Saville Avenue, one of three Quincy sites that house college facilities.

While Tsaffaras has long-range plans for Quincy College - he calls it “putting things in place that won’t come to fruition for 20 years’’ - some changes and improvements can be made in the short range.

For full-time faculty: new laptop computers at the start of the semester.

For part-time (or adjunct) faculty: more money. The part-time faculty members, who provide most of the classroom teaching at Quincy College as they do in most colleges, deserved more recognition, Tsaffaras said. He increased the per-course pay rate of part-time teachers with 10 years experience by $500, up from $2,000 per course. All part-timers will receive $100 per-course increases for six consecutive semesters.

“He wants to pay people what they deserve, as opposed to pinching pennies,’’ said Glen Gaudreau, recently promoted to full-time status as a science instructor after teaching as a part-timer for 23 years. “He respects adjuncts.’’

For students, improved facilities: 24-hour printing portals in all buildings and information screens throughout the campus showing updates such as class cancellations. New simulation labs and 13,000 square feet of new instructional space for the school’s popular nursing program. And a senior administrator on duty during evening classes, in case registration or other problems come up.

“He turned around the tech support program completely,’’ said math teacher Paul Felker. “He got the Xerox machines working.’’

For the college’s growing Plymouth campus, located in Cordage Park: new science labs and the campus’s first library.

Changes came for administrators, too: required classroom teaching for everyone - administrators, senior faculty, curriculum coordinators, deans.

“At first I was wondering how to fit this into my schedule,’’ said Mary Burke, dean of the Plymouth campus. But now, she said last week, teaching her biology class is “the favorite part of Friday.’’ It helps her do her job as dean as well. “Because I do know the students, I hear their concerns.’’

Members of the college community say the president’s active involvement in day-to-day issues raised morale throughout an institution that has done well in attracting students to its workplace-oriented programs, but sometimes appeared to be drifting.

“Quincy College was a magnitude, not a vector,’’ said Felker, who added that his frequent conversations with Tsaffaras are not typical of teacher-president relations elsewhere in the academic world.

Quincy College, Felker said, is “on the front lines in education for people who don’t have a trust fund.’’

The college charges $170 per credit for basic liberal arts courses, though science and nursing courses charge higher rates. A 12-credit semester of liberal arts would cost $2,040 plus a $100 registration fee. Registered nursing courses charge $587 a credit.

Under Tsaffaras, Felker said, the college’s direction is toward “higher competency. He wants to make Quincy College top notch.’’

“He’s hands-on, he’s highly visible,’’ agreed Bill Boozang, a former part-time teacher in the school’s English department who is now a member of its board of governors.

“He realizes the importance of consolidating the physical facilities,’’ Boozang said. “He has an eye on moving Quincy College to Quincy Center, where it belongs.’’

The college, which holds many classes in rented space in a North Quincy building, recently announced it was moving the nursing program to a site across the street from City Hall and the MBTA’s Quincy Center Station. Tsaffaras also won approval from the City Council to lease up to 100,000 square feet in new space, saying negotiations for the new space were underway. Technically a city department, the college requires the city’s approval of major lease agreements.

“He leads by example,’’ said Wayne Westcott, head of the college’s exercise science major, a young program with 45 students. Westcott said the college president is “a regular’’ at the strength and conditioning wellness class offered both to the campus and the larger community.

Tsaffaras said the college’s direction is high-intensity focus on the quality of education in the classroom. “Everything that we do at the college is oriented toward teaching and learning.’’

The new president deflected praise for his first-year successes to the college’s governing board - “We have a great board,’’ he said - faculty, a motivated student body, and a supportive community from city government down to the man on the street.

“The reservoir of good will for Quincy College in this town is very valuable,’’ Tsaffaras said. “It’s so affirming. People really want you to succeed.’’

Robert Knox can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Quincy College President Tsaffaras to receive award

October 31, 2011

The Boston State College Steering Committee will honor Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras with its Education for Service Award.

QUINCY —

The Boston State College Steering Committee will honor Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras with its Education for Service Award.

Tsaffaras is a 1973 graduate of Boston State College, which merged with the University of Massachusetts. The steering committee has given awards to alumni and others over the past four years.

The award will be presented during a ceremony Dec. 1 at the UMass-Boston Campus Center. Tsaffaras, who became Quincy College president in January, is one of five people who will be honored.

Read more: http://www.patriotledger.com/news/education/x163303976/Quincy-College-President-Tsaffaras-to-receive-award#ixzz1di7ZF5DB

Quincy College gets OK to triple lease space for nursing

October 4, 2011

Quincy College is considering a space triple the size of what it initially sought for its relocated nursing program.

By: Jack Encarnacao
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QUINCY —

Quincy College is considering a space triple the size of what it initially sought for its relocated nursing program.
The city council voted Monday to grant the college permission to lease 100,000 square feet of space for the nursing program, which officials say has outgrown its current classroom space. In June, the college sought and received city council approval to lease 30,000 square feet for the move.

School President Peter Tsaffaras said responses to the college’s request for lease bids yielded offers for space that exceeded 30,000 square feet for less money.

He said the college plans to complete negotiations on a lease within 30 days, move into the space starting in January and be open for the next school year. The lease is not to exceed eight years.

The college will move out of its 13,000-square-foot space on Temple Street, which houses the nursing program.

“We’re constrained now,” Tsaffaras said. “We’re short of classrooms and other space.”

In the new space, the nursing program would grow from three to eight classrooms and from one laboratory to three. The space would also house a library specifically for nursing students, and bring together nursing faculty currently teaching at different sites.

Tsaffaras said the college has seen a student population growth of 24 percent over the past five years, and is exploring adding online courses.

“All of this makes sense,” City Council President Kevin Coughlin said before Monday’s vote. “Everything I hear and everything I read tells me the college is bursting at the seams.”

Tsaffaras said the college will build a clause into the lease that will allow it to leave for a new downtown campus in 2016.

He said Monday that Street-Works LLC, which is embarking on a $1.6 billion makeover of Quincy Center, will incorporate 200,000 square feet of space for the college in its project. Street-Works is targeting 2020 as a completion date for its Quincy Center project, which will include more than 1 million square feet of office space.

Quincy College has classrooms and offices at 17 Temple St. and 24 Saville Ave. in Quincy Center, as well as at 150 Newport Ave. Extension in North Quincy. It also has a campus in Plymouth, which will continue to operate separately from the Quincy location.

Tsaffaras said the college will soon be moving out of its North Quincy location; its lease expires in October 2012. The college moved there on a temporary basis in 2007 when it relocated offices from Coddington Hall on Coddington Street.

Jack Encarnacao is at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Debut album pleases Quincy College student from Nepal

September 28, 2011

By Jessica Bartlett, Town Correspondent
For 24-year-old Quincy College international student Joyous Gurung, music is practically in his blood. After over a decade of practice, years away from his home in Nepal, and hours spent teaching himself guitar, he has recorded his first album.

Saath – meaning "company" or "support" in Napali, was released in May, and is the tangible reality to several months locked in a recording studio with friend Yuki Kanesaka.

It’s an album formed after playing in local coffee shops and for other students at Quincy College, Gurung says, and is the culmination of hours of hard work.

“It was so much fun to see the music evolve, and we would constantly challenge each other with new ideas to improve the arrangements,” Gurung said.

The goal was to create organic, clean, and smooth sounds, he said of the music.

In a way, the release is a stepping out from the shadow of his relatives, who are well known for their musical talents abroad.

According to the College, Gurung’s father is a classical guitarist who studied at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music on a full scholarship before receiving a Master of Arts in ethnomusicology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1992.

Two of his uncles attended Berklee College of Music on full scholarships.

The crown jewel of the musical talents perhaps lies in Gurung’s grandfather, who is known for writing the Nepalese national anthem.

“My musical inspiration and passion came from growing up with my loving family in Kathmandu, Nepal. Every corner of my home was filled with musical notes that lifted my heart and nourished my soul,” Gurung said.

It was a beginning that would inspire him to pick up the guitar himself and then start writing songs at age 12. He would later move to the states in 2006 to attend a community college in Connecticut, where his love of music writing grew.

“Writing songs helped me channel my emotions and re-connect me with memories of my loved ones left behind in Nepal. Music gave me a comfort zone where I could feel better about myself and think positively about my future,” Gurung said.

In 2010, Gurung began studying computer science and graphic design at Quincy College, where he met with others who shared his ambitious musical dreams.

With one album on the market, Gurung has already started looking toward recording and releasing a second with his new band, Sound Craft.

“Someone once told me, ‘Never look in the rear-view mirror – always focus on the here and now’ - I’m heeding this advice and currently working on my second EP and composing new songs,” he said

Gurung also hopes to launch Saath back home in Nepal and would like to record his second album in the United States by the end of 2011.

Additionally, he has called on-air radio programs in Nepal and plans to go back home this winter to visit.

Meanwhile, the band, consisting of Gurung on vocals/guitar, Kanesaka on electric keys/saxophone; Masato Ittoh on guitar, and Takuma Anzai on drums has already played numerous shows here in Boston.

According to Gurung, they are continuing to explore different sounds and experiment with musical ideas.

Saath is now available on iTunes. Gurung plans to donate profits to charity and Non-Governmental Organizations to build schools and buy books for children from Third World countries.

To see a clip of the making of the album, click here.


Boston.com

Quincy College Trust to hold “Hats Off” fundraising event

September 26, 2011

On Wednesday, October 5th, the Quincy College Trust will hold a “Hats Off” Fundraising Event.

The event will be held from 6-9pm in the River Room at the Adams Inn and guests are encouraged to wear a hat of choice. Tickets are $30 in advance or $40 at the door. To purchase tickets, please send a check made payable to Quincy College Trust to Debby Stockbridge, Quincy College, 150 Newport Ave., Ext., Quincy, MA 02171. For more information, please call 617.984.1725. There will be appetizers, remarks by Quincy College President Peter H. Tsaffaras, a 50/50 raffle with 50% of proceeds going to scholarships, and more.

“Public events such as these are not only joyful social occasions; they also serve to underscore the deep roots which Quincy College has in the community. The College is indeed fortunate to have public-spirited citizens, such as the members of the Quincy College Trust who recognize the close relationship between the college and the community and the community and the college”, said Quincy College President Peter H. Tsaffaras.

The Quincy College Trust is the charitable fund-raising arm for Quincy College that supports the College by receiving endowment funds, charitable gifts, donations, grants and property from all sources. The Quincy College Trust also uses the funds to award scholarships to deserving students. In 2011, the Trust awarded a total of $6,000 in scholarships to deserving Quincy College students.

Quincy College named “Military Friendly” school by G.I. Jobs Magazine

September 16, 2011

By Jessica Bartlett, Town Correspondent
Quincy College has been named a “Military Friendly” school by G.I. Jobs Magazine, the premier magazine for military personnel transitioning into civilian life, for their efforts to recruit, embrace, and help veterans and service professionals in college life.

The list includes the top 20 percent of colleges, universities, and trade schools that are doing the most to incorporate America’s military members, and this year, Quincy College was among the 1,518 colleges out of 8,000 reviewed that made the list.

“These schools are making the grade by offering scholarships and discounts, veterans’ clubs, full-time staff, military credit and other services to those who served,” a release said.

Specifically in Quincy, the Quincy College Veterans Discount Program allows veterans to enroll in either Liberal Arts or Business & Public Services classes at a discounted rate.

The discounts are offered regardless of the number of courses taken in a semester.

What makes Quincy even more unique is that the college offers these specials on their own dime.

“The veteran discount program is not funded by the state or federal government; therefore veterans who areeligible for education benefits through the VA may also receive the Quincy College discounted rate,” the release said.

Quincy College is also a member of the Service Members Opportunity Colleges Consortium (SOC), where advisors from the school help to review transcripts and test scores to enable students to transfer credit.

Additionally, Veterans, veteran dependents, and active duty service members are able to use their federal education benefits at Quincy College. These include the Post 9/11 GI Bill, Montgomery GI Bill, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Tuition Assistance.

It’s all in an effort to embrace service professionals who are sacrificing themselves for our country, said Quincy College President Peter Tsaffaras.

According to Tsaffaras, the program is “yet another positive step in our commitment to make Quincy College an institution where we value the sacrifices made by our veterans in serving our country and provide an environment which is both receptive and accommodating to what are often the distinct needs of veterans,” he said.

For more information on the Quincy College Military & Veterans Program, contact John Ebuen, Director of Military and Veteran’s Services at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or by phone at 617-984-1735

Quincy College “Constitution Day”

September 14, 2011

On Monday, September 19th, Quincy College will host celebrate its annual “Constitution Day” event. The event will be held in Newport Hall at Quincy College, 150 Newport Ave., Ext., in the Student Lounge on the second floor from 1:00 pm – 2:30pm.

The presentation will feature William Hogeland, author of the critically acclaimed narrative histories The Whiskey Rebellion and Declaration: The Nine Tumultuous Weeks When America Became Independent, May 1 – July 4, 1776. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, American History Magazine, Boston Review, Slate, and the Huffington Post. The presentation will explore the political conflicts over class, economics, and privilege that our founders worked into this document. The event is open to the public and refreshments will be provided.

Quincy College Exercise Science Instructor Publishes Research Paper

August 24, 2011

Wayne Westcott, Instructor for the Exercise Science Program at Quincy College was recently published in the Journal of Exercise Physiology Online (Volume 14.Number 4. August 2011). The 9 month study took place at Quincy College and included fifty-two participants (48 women and 4 men) ranging in age from 39 to 82 years that were separated into three study groups.

The Control Group did not exercise or take nutritional supplements; The Exercise Group did not take nutritional supplements but performed strength and aerobic training; and The Exercise and Nutrition Group performed strength and aerobic training while taking nutritional supplements.

Students in both the Exercise and Exercise & Nutrition Group completed one hour of physical activity that included 25 minutes of resistance exercise strength training utilizing twelve Nautilus machines, 25 minutes of aerobic exercise, and 5 minutes of stretching. In addition to the strength and aerobic training, The Exercise and Nutrition Group drank a protein and carbohydrate shake immediately after each training session, as well as took a daily vitamin that contained calcium and vitamin D.

After the nine-month study was complete, results showed that the Exercise and Nutrition Group attained significantly greater increases in lean (muscle) weight and significantly greater reductions in resting blood pressure than the other groups. Dr. Westcott expresses his appreciation to all of the Quincy College Exercise Science staff and students who assisted in this important research study that clearly revealed the advantages of combining sensible nutrition and appropriate physical activity for improved health and fitness.

Quincy College offers both an Associate’s Degree and Certificate Degree Program in Exercise Science. The Associate’s degree program of study is designed for students who wish to continue their education in the field of exercise and fitness. The program will allow students the opportunity to hone their skills as fitness professionals; develop their interpersonal communication and critical thinking skills; and become familiar with basic management principles that will help them in finding a career in the fitness industry. The certificate program is designed for students who want to work as exercise instructors in fitness centers or as independent personal trainers. Completion of this program prepares students to pass professional certification exams, such as those offered by the American Council on Exercise.

“The education I received as a student in the Exercise Science Program prepared me to change my career after the age of 50. I am now a Nationally Certified ACE Personal Trainer employed at Quincy College, and work as a Personal Trainer, Specialty Class Instructor, and Floor Supervisor at the South Shore YMCA. I also have clients whom I train in their homes. I truly love my job and the fact that I am helping people get healthier through proper exercise,” said Quincy College graduate Maggie Faretra.

“The Quincy College Exercise Science Program has achieved national recognition for its research on strength training, and our graduates have attained prominent professional positions locally in the field of fitness”, says Wayne Westcott, Instructor for the Exercise Science Program at Quincy College.

Students who are interested in enrolling in this program must fill out an application form and obtain an advisor’s signature prior to registering. More information can be found on the Quincy College website.

Quincy College Announces New Academic Programs to Begin Fall 2011

August 23, 2011

Quincy College is pleased to announce three new academic programs beginning this fall. The following outlines the details of the programs and expected outcomes once the programs are completed.

Clinical Laboratory Science
The Associate Degree in Clinical Laboratory Science is offered as a two-year program at the Quincy Campus. Medical Laboratory Technicians (MLT) play a vital role in performing clinical laboratory testing to provide scientific information in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease. Medical Laboratory Technicians work in hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices and forensic labs.

Upon successful completion of the CLS program, the student will graduate with an Associate of Science Degree. Graduation from the program is not contingent upon student performance on national certification examination. The graduate may also advance in the field to become a technologist or specialist by pursuing additional education and technical experience.

Upon completion of the Clinical Laboratory Science Program, the graduate is prepared to:
• Collect, process, and preserve blood and other body fluid samples.
• Perform and report laboratory tests in a variety of laboratory settings.
• Operate laboratory equipment and instruments, performing preventive and corrective maintenance as required.
• Identify pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical variables that affect procedures, instruments and results, and take appropriate corrective action.
• Perform mathematical functions as required by laboratory procedures.
• Perform and monitor quality assurance and quality control techniques.
• Practice laboratory safety and regulatory compliance.
• Perform information processing functions in the clinical laboratory.
• Apply laboratory results to diagnosis and treatment of clinical conditions and/or diseases.
• Communicate with colleagues and patients in a professional manner.
• Model professional behaviors, ethics, and appearance.
• Work effectively as a team member recognizing the comprehensive impact this has on health care.

Biotechnology Program
The Biotechnology Program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in the bio manufacturing or biomedical research industries. Students will develop a broad laboratory science-based background through courses focused in the life and chemical sciences, and will obtain industry-specific knowledge in the areas of quality control (QC), process development (PD), upstream and downstream processing, all while following current, good manufacturing practices (cGMP). In addition, students will learn valuable laboratory techniques and instrumentation, and develop critical thinking skills. Upon successful completion of the program, students may enter the workforce directly as entry-level laboratory technicians or research assistants, or may transfer to a four-year university to continue their studies at the baccalaureate level.

Upon completion of the Biotechnology and Compliance Program the student should be able to:
• Practice ethical standards of integrity, honesty, and fairness in scientific practices and professional conduct
• Compare and contrast aspects of the central dogma: DNA→mRNA→Protein;
• Use appropriate computer software and hardware skills to accomplish biotechnology lab tasks.
• Demonstrate technical knowledge of specialized techniques and instrumentation.
• Communicate thoughts, orally and in writing, in a clear well-organized manner that effectively informs and clarifies scientific principles and lab techniques;
• Use scientific procedures and current and emerging technologies to conduct safe and appropriate laboratory experiments and to collect data that are validated and documented;
• Comply with and adhere to national, state, and local standards, policies, protocols, and regulations for laboratory and manufacturing activity;
• Apply scientific knowledge and principles as well as quantitative methods and relevant technology to think critically and solve complex problems in biotechnology.

Computer Science/Media Arts
The Computer Science Program is a program that is designed to prepare students for a variety of entry level positions in a networked environment within the computer science industry, and to provide additional training or further advancement to those already employed in the computer science profession. The program design includes the core curriculum, a general computer science core, skills courses, and courses specific to the computer science areas. Students may choose to concentrate their studies in Computer Science Networking/Transfer, Networking/Career, or Media Arts.

At the conclusion of this concentration, successful students will be able to:
• Develop a concept into a message and communicate that message effectively
• Create a method, or treatment, to deliver the message through sound, motion, graphics and editing
• Write an audio/video script and construct a story board
• Manage a production timeline and create a shoot list for production
• Analyze equipment and time to budget production needs
• Make custom music tracks, apply filters for effect and refine the edit process
• Identify, assemble, and insert editing methods
• Apply digital effects to create scene-to-scene transitions
• Create text graphics in roll, crawl and superimpose applications
• Manage and store digital assets and final programs
• Create basic animation for video and animated text to complement video programs
• Construct special effects for multimedia presentations
• Create animation with moving video frames and build 3D objects
• Use imported layers and devise effects for Web and DVD formats
• Set-up and operate a video camera, and organize and manage digital assets
• Use supplementary microphones to capture audio files
• Assemble a video program using non-linear editing software

Students who are interested in enrolling in any of the above programs must fill out an application form and obtain an advisor’s signature prior to registering. More information can be found on the Quincy College website.

Middle School Students Experience “Summer Science” at Quincy College

August 19, 2011

Quincy College hosted a Summer Science Experience for 7th and 8th graders last week (Monday, 8/15 – Friday, 8/19) at its Quincy campus.

The week-long program covered Microbiology, Biotechnology, Health Science and other life science courses taught by Quincy College faculty in the College’s state-of-the-art science laboratories at 24 Saville Avenue in Quincy Center.

“We’d like to foster science exploration in today’s younger generation,” says Matthew Sullivan, Science Lab Coordinator and Natural Sciences instructor at the College. “Middle school students are taking their first steps in deciding the direction of their futures, so we’d like to introduce them to the wealth of opportunities in the sciences. Through the Science Summer Experience, students prepared themselves for a future in science as they look forward to high school.”

The five-day program featured six science-themed sessions and has 7th and 8th grade students from the local area participating.