Security Administration

Academic Division of Professional Programs

The Security Administration Certificate provides students with knowledge about the theories and principles associated with multiple dimensions within the security industry. The certificate will enable the student to comprehend a wide array of topics including private security, corporate investigations, protection of assets, and interpersonal communications, providing them with a basic understanding of the security industry. Required courses establish a holistic approach toward developing a well-rounded security professional by combining topics surrounding private security, interpersonal communication, customer service and administrative issues.

*Please note that some courses in the curriculum for the certificate may require prior completion of a prerequisite course that is not specifically required for the certificate. In such cases, the prerequisite course must be completed even though it is not part of the certificate requirement.

Download the Security Administration Certificate overview sheet.

Certificates

The Security Administration Certificate provides students with knowledge about the theories and principles associated with multiple dimensions within the security industry. The certificate will enable the student to comprehend a wide array of topics including private security, corporate investigations, protection of assets, and interpersonal communications, providing them with a basic understanding of the security industry. Required courses establish a holistic approach toward developing a well-rounded security professional by combining topics surrounding private security, interpersonal communication, customer service and administrative issues.

Program Outcomes
At the completion of the program the student should be able to:

Engage in the practice of private security at agencies such as hospitals, private corporations, event centers, and federal government contracting with a broader knowledge of the practice and a strategic advantage over other candidates.

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Plymouth

Quincy

Security Administration Courses
    •  
    • Code
    • Course
    • Credits
    • CJS 211
    • Introduction to Security Procedures
    • 3
    This course includes the historical and philosophical bases of security and a survey of administrative, personnel, and physical aspects of the field. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • BUS 202
    • Principles of Customer Service
    • 3
    This course examines the principles of customer service and their significance in a service-driven economy. Topics covered include: The Service Strategy, The Customer: Internal & External; Customers’ Wants & Needs; Communicating Customer Service; Profiles of Successful Companies; Service People-Motivation, Commitment, and Reward. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • ENG 111
    • Speech Communication
    • 3
    Special attention is given to developing self-confidence and skill in oral communication by affording each student an opportunity to participate in a maximum number of speech situations. Practice situations include extemporaneous speeches, panel discussions, and evaluative listening.
    • SOC 112
    • Interpersonal Communication
    • 3
    An experience-based introduction to the concepts and skills in oral communication; listening, feedback, group discussions, speeches, self-disclosure and relational communication.
    • CJS 117
    • Crisis Intervention & the Police
    • 3
    This course will examine the police officer responding to a wide range of calls which involve the potential for crisis. This course will involve incidents with violent individuals as well as volatile groups that the police officer often comes into contact with. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CJS 213
    • Security Administration
    • 3
    This course examines significant topics in private security administration, including security planning, legal issues, managing investigations and the securing of assets, training, and human resource management. Placement at ENG 101 level is strongly advised.
    • CSI 242
    • Computer Systems Security
    • 3
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of computer and network security with applications in the Windows 2000 Environment. Topics include authentication, securing Web and file transfer applications, cryptography, firewalls and other devices and network topologies. At the end of this course the student will be able to securely administer a Windows 2000 server environment. Prerequisite: CSI 244.
    • ENG 224
    • Writing for Professionals
    • 3
    Students develop writing techniques and conventions peculiar to magazine writing, advertising, business, technical writing, and editorializing. Ads, technical articles, reports, abstracts, manuals, and documentation will be practiced.
    • IDS 155
    • Critical Thinking & Writing
    • 3
    This course provides students with a foundation and practice in thinking clearly and critically. Practice includes developing writing skills that will enable students to clearly present claims to support their conclusions and avoid reinforcing biases. Practice in thinking clearly includes the opportunity to analyze and discuss various types of media - including television, cinema and print - to determine which sources provide the most reliable information and to identify faulty thinking. Topics addressed include the relationship between critical thinking and clear writing, credibility of sources, rhetorical devices, fallacies, unclear or misleading language, and the characteristics of various types of arguments.
    • CJS 121
    • Criminal Procedure
    • 3
    This course introduces the student to the basics of criminal procedure, including the law of search and seizure, arrest, interrogation and identification, the pretrial process, the criminal trial, sentencing and punishment, appeal and post-conviction relief, and constitutional safeguards in state and federal criminal proceedings. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CJS 131
    • Introduction to Homeland Security
    • 3
    An introduction to Homeland Security as an evolving policy issue, matter of national concern, and a profession, the course prepares students to explore this area of policy, law enforcement/emergency response, and government. This course addresses terrorism, natural disaster, policy development, legal and criminal justice issues, and concepts regarding the structure and authority of the Department of Homeland Security and related agencies. Case studies are examined focusing on threat assessment, disasters, past acts of terrorism, and potential risks facing the nation. Also explored are prevention, mitigation, and response to threats both natural and man-made.
    • CJS 132
    • Weapons of Mass Destruction
    • 3
    Today’s terrorism is characterized by sophistication, organization, financial capacity, and a degree of violence directed at mass populations heretofore unseen. This course presents an overview of the threat of terrorism as posed by weapons of mass destruction, with a focus on nuclear, biological, explosive, and chemical weapons, prevention of, preparation for, and the response to such threats. The focus is on the roles of the first responder before, during, and after WMD incidents.
    • CJS 215
    • White-Collar Crime
    • 3
    This course deals with the rise, nature, causes, and consequences of white-collar crime and addresses such subjects as corporate crime, occupational crime, financial crime, public corruption, technology-based crime, and policing and prosecuting white-collar crime.
    • LAW 203
    • Cyber Law
    • 3
    Developing computer technology has led to the development of new law relative to both the acquisition of information and doing business in cyberspace. This course will explore the legal issues arising from those changes. While focused primarily on business applications, the material covered will include contracts and torts related to the Internet, intellectual property rights, security, and privacy rights of the Internet user. Court decisions, statutes and administrative rulings will be presented.
    • SOC 116
    • Intercultural Communication
    • 3
    This course will develop awareness of how human culture affects individual perception and interpersonal communication. Through literature and journalism, film and music, communicative activities and research projects, students will expand their capacity to understand themselves and communicate with other members of the human family. Particular attention will be paid to other cultural groups represented by class members.
    • CJS 297
    • Criminal Justice Internship
    • 3
    The student works in a supervised work experience in a related criminal justice capacity for at least 90 hours over a semester. A term paper is submitted to the coordinator. Prior permission of the coordinator is required. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.

    • CJS 212
    • Corporate Security Investigations
    • 3
    The role of private security and its relationship with the public sector continues to expand with more resources and responsibilities being leveraged on behalf of the private sector to ensure the areas of fraud, risk mitigation and emergency response are fully compliant and capable to address any situation. These enhanced responsibilities have created the need for individuals to develop more advanced investigatory skill sets. This course is designed to expose the student to multiple investigations and investigatory techniques with a specific focus on how these investigations affect private security and the relationship with public law enforcement. Topics covered will include evidence collecting, risk assessment, report writing, white collar crime, industrial espionage, workplace violence, terrorism, interview and interrogation, computer crime and courtroom testimony. Prerequisite: CJS 101.
    • CJS 108
    • Criminal Justice Ethics
    • 3
    This course will examine a variety of ethical issues faced by justice officials, such as the relationship between personal ethics and social expectations; professional ethics; the use of force; issues of race, gender and class; and noble cause corruption. Students will examine the importance of an ethical foundation for law enforcement while they compare and contrast ethical codes from various sources in the public safety community and historical warrior classes. Special attention will be paid to the concept of noble cause corruption and the compound effects of those outcomes. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.

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Contact Info:

Quincy Campus

1250 Hancock Street
Quincy, MA 02169

Tel:  (617) 984-1700

Plymouth Campus

36 Cordage Park Circle
Plymouth, MA 02360

Tel:  (508) 747-0400

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