Security Management

Academic Division of Professional Programs

This program prepares graduates to engage in the practice of private security by providing them with knowledge about the theories and principles associated with multiple dimensions within the security industry, including private security, corporate investigations, protection of assets, and interpersonal communications. Required courses establish a holistic approach toward developing a well-rounded security professional by combining topics surrounding private security, interpersonal communication, customer service and administrative issues.

Download the Criminal Justice: Security Management Associate in Science Degree overview sheet. 

Degrees

This program prepares graduates to engage in the practice of private security by providing them with knowledge about the theories and principles associated with multiple dimensions within the security industry, including private security, corporate investigations, protection of assets, and interpersonal communications. Required courses establish a holistic approach toward developing a well-rounded security professional by combining topics surrounding private security, interpersonal communication, customer service and administrative issues.

Program Outcomes
At the completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  • Identify the critical components of business continuity.
  • Articulate how to successfully manage both a contract and proprietary security program.
  • Describe the process of how to conduct a security investigation from its inception to prosecution.
  • Explain the entire incident command process from the preplanning stages to the post event after action review.
  • Explain the integration of the concepts taught in the component courses as they relate to risk assessment, management, and mitigation of the overall enterprise.
  • Conduct comprehensive security risk assessments along with mitigation strategies.

Plymouth

Quincy

Security Management Courses
    •  
    • Code
    • Course
    • Credits
    • BUS 101
    • Introduction to Business
    • 3
    The role, growth, structure, and functional organization of modern business in the U.S. economy is explored. Comparative economic systems, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and the management, marketing, and financing of business organizations are covered. Opportunities in the business field are examined throughout the course. Students will be expected to complete outside research as a course requirement. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CJS 117
    • Crisis Intervention & the Police
    • 3
    This course will examine the police officer responding to a wide range of calls which involve the potential for crisis. This course will involve incidents with violent individuals as well as volatile groups that the police officer often comes into contact with. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CJS 121
    • Criminal Procedure
    • 3
    This course introduces the student to the basics of criminal procedure, including the law of search and seizure, arrest, interrogation and identification, the pretrial process, the criminal trial, sentencing and punishment, appeal and post-conviction relief, and constitutional safeguards in state and federal criminal proceedings. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CJS 131
    • Introduction to Homeland Security
    • 3
    An introduction to Homeland Security as an evolving policy issue, matter of national concern, and a profession, the course prepares students to explore this area of policy, law enforcement/emergency response, and government. This course addresses terrorism, natural disaster, policy development, legal and criminal justice issues, and concepts regarding the structure and authority of the Department of Homeland Security and related agencies. Case studies are examined focusing on threat assessment, disasters, past acts of terrorism, and potential risks facing the nation. Also explored are prevention, mitigation, and response to threats both natural and man-made.
    • CJS 132
    • Weapons of Mass Destruction
    • 3
    Today’s terrorism is characterized by sophistication, organization, financial capacity, and a degree of violence directed at mass populations heretofore unseen. This course presents an overview of the threat of terrorism as posed by weapons of mass destruction, with a focus on nuclear, biological, explosive, and chemical weapons, prevention of, preparation for, and the response to such threats. The focus is on the roles of the first responder before, during, and after WMD incidents.
    • CJS 214
    • Risk Analysis and Disaster Management
    • 3
    This course will introduce students to themes and practices surrounding the value of information and intelligence, collaboration between public/private law enforcement agencies, and strategic awareness of threat and risk mitigation; themes with which police and security agencies have become intimately familiar since 9/11. Students will learn to balance and mitigate risk in the environments of private security, crime and terrorism, natural disasters, and threats to the nation’s critical infrastructure. Students will learn how risk analysis contributes to all decisions surrounding threats and hazards, how risk balance works and how it can be applied in the efforts of preparedness, prevention, and response strategies. Students who successful complete the course will earn 3 semester credits. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and CJS 211.
    • CJS 215
    • White-Collar Crime
    • 3
    This course deals with the rise, nature, causes, and consequences of white-collar crime and addresses such subjects as corporate crime, occupational crime, financial crime, public corruption, technology-based crime, and policing and prosecuting white-collar crime.
    • CJS 221
    • Domestic Violence, Abuse & Neglect
    • 3
    A survey of domestic violence including spousal or partner battering, child abuse and child neglect, causes, effects, and consequences of domestic violence; judicial, law enforcement and other interventions to protect victims; practical applications of the law; assisting victims/clients with resource and referral assessment; and study of public policy, criminal justice, and legal issues and problems. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • CSI 242
    • Computer Systems Security
    • 3
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of computer and network security with applications in the Windows 2000 Environment. Topics include authentication, securing Web and file transfer applications, cryptography, firewalls and other devices and network topologies. At the end of this course the student will be able to securely administer a Windows 2000 server environment. Prerequisite: CSI 244.
    • CJS 297
    • Criminal Justice Internship
    • 3
    The student works in a supervised work experience in a related criminal justice capacity for at least 90 hours over a semester. A term paper is submitted to the coordinator. Prior permission of the coordinator is required. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.

    • CJS 108
    • Criminal Justice Ethics
    • 3
    This course will examine a variety of ethical issues faced by justice officials, such as the relationship between personal ethics and social expectations; professional ethics; the use of force; issues of race, gender and class; and noble cause corruption. Students will examine the importance of an ethical foundation for law enforcement while they compare and contrast ethical codes from various sources in the public safety community and historical warrior classes. Special attention will be paid to the concept of noble cause corruption and the compound effects of those outcomes. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.

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Contact Info:

Quincy Campus

1250 Hancock Street
Quincy, MA 02169

Tel:  (617) 984-1700

Plymouth Campus

36 Cordage Park Circle
Plymouth, MA 02360

Tel:  (508) 747-0400

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