Health Sciences

Associate in Science

The Associate in Science Health Sciences degree utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of health sciences. It provides students with a strong core foundation in both biological sciences and liberal arts and offers elective studies of community and public health, sociology, or ethics that will apply to a wide range of careers in health, human services, or public health. It prepares students to complete further health science-related programs of study, transfer to a four-year program of study or enter the workforce in an entry-level position in related health sciences.

 

Health Sciences Courses
    •  
    • Code
    • Course
    • Credits
    • ENG 101
    • English Composition I
    • 3
    A required course for all students who have demonstrated acceptable writing proficiency as measured by a standard test or satisfactory completion of ENG 090. This course will emphasize developing the student’s ability to articulate his/her thoughts in writing a coherent, unified, and well-structured composition. The student will write a series of papers. The student will also learn the techniques needed to produce a library research paper. The required research paper is a major component of the course.
    • ENG 102
    • English Composition II
    • 3
    A required course, which introduces the student to themes and techniques in the basic genres of literature: the short story, drama, and poetry. Expository papers may be written in response to ideas embodied in literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of instructor.
    • IDS 167
    • First Year Seminar
    • 3
    This experiential course welcomes students into the academic learning community of Quincy College. Centered around a yearly theme, the purpose of the course is to ensure that all new students connect to the Quincy College community. All sections provide students with college success strategies and each focuses on one of five different perspectives: 1) Humanities, 2) Social Sciences, 3) Civic Engagement, 4) Business, 5) Natural Sciences. The course is required for all new, degree-seeking students who have fewer than 12 college credits from another accredited institution. It is expected that students will take this course in their first semester at QC.
    • MAT 103
    • College Algebra
    • 3
    This college level algebra course expands upon a student’s knowledge by further developing algebraic concepts. Topics include graphing equations with an introduction to functions, factoring polynomials, operations on rational functions, simplifying rational exponents, and solving quadratic equations. Students will be required to complete homework assignments using a web-based computer program. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placement test or successful completion of MAT 097.
    • BIO 111
    • General Biology I
    • 4
    An introductory course in Biology with main emphasis on cell structure and function. Lecture topics include: Gene structure and inheritance, study of plants and fungi, evolution, and ecology. Extensive discussion of concerns facing humanity today including quality of nutrition, environmental pollution, genetic engineering, inheritable diseases, and birth defects. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • PSY 101
    • General Psychology
    • 3
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, major theories, different theoretical perspectives and research methods in psychology. The focus is on theories of personality, motivation, learning, intelligence, emotions, developmental processes, physiological psychology, perception, and psychological assessment. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • BIO 131
    • Anatomy & Physiology I
    • 4
    An Integrated study of the structure and function of the human body including atoms, molecules, cells, tissues, and organs. The skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory and endocrine systems are studied. Laboratory experience is correlated with classroom lecture. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Prerequisite: BIO 111 with “C” or better.
    • BIO 132
    • Anatomy & Physiology II
    • 4
    An integrated study of the structure and function of the human body including the reproductive, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems. Laboratory experience is correlated with classroom lecture. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Prerequisite: BIO 131 with “C” or better.
    • BIO 251
    • Microbiology w/Lab
    • 4
    (formerly BIO 151) A study of non-pathogenic and pathogenic microorganisms designed primarily for students in the health sciences area. Topics covered include: microbial characteristics, control of micro-organisms, defenses of the host, and cause, prevention, and control of infectious diseases. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Prerequisite: BIO 111 with “C” or better. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • MAT 107
    • Statistics
    • 3
    (Formerly MAT 207) Introduces the student to the fundamental methods of mathematical statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion probability, sampling distributions, problems with the normal and t-distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Students will be required to complete homework assignments using a web-based computer program. Prerequisite: Beginning Algebra MAT 097 or Equivalent or Permission of Instructor.
    • HSC 107
    • Orientation to Health Care
    • 1
    This course is designed to introduce and provide a brief overview of the U.S. health care industry. Using the Internet, discussion and individual research for this course, this course creates awareness of and curiosity for the health care delivery system. It also encourages students to value cultural diversity and professionalism. Topics include: U.S. Health care industry, trends in health care, health care financing and reimbursement, ethical and legal issues and other health care topics.
    • CHE 121
    • General Chemistry I
    • 4
    A study of the fundamental chemical laws and theories. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical and physical properties, change of state, solution chemistry and gas laws. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, no-open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Prerequisite: MAT 103 with “C” or better.
    • PHY 111
    • General Physics I
    • 4
    This is an algebra-based physics course designed to introduce students to ideas of measurements, units, motion, force, energy, momentum, rotation, and fluids. Students will analyze the motion of physical systems including objects in free-fall, objects moving at a constant velocity, objects moving with constant acceleration, collisions between multiple objects, and systems undergoing rotation. During the lab component of the course, students will design and perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and communicate experimental results. Prerequisite: MAT 103 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher. Strongly recommended: MAT 113 or MAT 204
    • HIS 220
    • American Health Care History
    • 3
    This course explores change, ideas and the multiple meanings of health, illness, and the life cycle within the context of health care development, organization, and delivery in the United States. It explores the process of how ideas, such as freedom of choice and individualism, develop and change; how they are culturally modified and highly dependent on time and place specific ideas related to racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, and regional differences. A central focus of this course is to explore and explain change and choice related to how Americans thought about their bodies, health, illness and sick care as well as what drove the ideas for the creation of a system of health care. This course explores the historical link to how in America a country with the best health care facilities in the world cannot provide the best health care to all.
    • HSC 140
    • Medical Terminology
    • 3
    This course provides a foundation for the understanding of medical terms, their abbreviations, basic anatomy and physiology as well as pathological conditions. It includes the study of prefixes and suffixes and root/stem words as well as medical technology terms with an emphasis on spelling, pronunciation, definitions and common usage. This course is similar to learning a foreign language and involves the memorization as well as the application of words/terms. The student will study and demonstrate proficiency in spelling, pronouncing, definition and application of medical terms.
    • MUS 110
    • Music Across Cultures
    • 3
    This course explores music across national boundaries in its cultural context. At the same time, it enhances the students’ listening, critical, and analytical skills along with their aesthetic ability. It is an excursion in non-western music with an emphasis on the cultures in which it flourished such as the selected music of China, Japan, India, Middle East, Latin America, Ethnic North America, Africa, and Eastern Europe. This course is open to music and non-music majors.
    • PHL 101
    • Introduction to Philosophy
    • 3
    This course is an introduction to Western philosophical thought. Students will be introduced to the vocabulary and the method of philosophical thinking. Basic questions concerning reality, knowledge, value (ethics) and society will be considered from several philosophical viewpoints-for example, idealism, materialism, empiricism, utilitarianism. Questions considered include: What is the nature of God? Is there good and evil? How can we know? What makes for a just society? Students will also be introduced to the historical development of important schools of philosophical thought, as well as to the life and contributions of their founders. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • PHL 102
    • Topics in 20th Century Philosophy
    • 3
    This course will focus on a major trend in 20th Century philosophy. The organizational structure may be by problematic consideration such as religious or moral questions by philosophers who have voiced their ideas, such as Sartre or James, or by existing schools of inquiry, such as European Existentialism or American Pragmatism.
    • PHL 113
    • Death and Dying
    • 3
    This course is a philosophical, sociological and psychological study of death and dying that seeks to explore this universal experience in what is essentially a death denying society. Among the topics covered are the historical, cultural and religious attitudes toward death, the funeral service industry, the ideas of facing one’s own death and experiencing a “good death”, the physical and emotional processes involved in dying, grief and bereavement, mourning rituals, death and dying among children and adolescents, legal implications, suicide, end-of-life issues, euthanasia and death from a global perspective. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.
    • PSY 216
    • Growth & Development
    • 3
    This course explores human growth and development across the lifespan, from how the fetus develops a preference for familiar voices, to the adolescent identity crisis, to the development of wisdom in late adulthood. The course is organized around major developmental periods in the lifespan. Contributions of significant developmental theorists are highlighted. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • BIO 106
    • Nutrition
    • 4
    This course focuses on nutrition across the life span. Students will gain an understanding of nutritional principles in both health and illness. Nutrition throughout the life span at all stages of development is emphasized. Nutritional bio-chemistry of all macronutrients will be covered. Lecture topics: Health promotion, nutritional guidelines, macro-nutrient chemistry, micro-nutrient chemistry, menu planning, food labeling, safety, obesity, clinical eating disorders, RDA requirements, and age related guidelines. Lab topics: Understanding of laboratory safety, keeping food consumption record, measuring carbohydrate, lipid, and protein content of food, fermenting, evaluating food oxidation, measuring vitamin solubility and stability, assessing enzymatic activity under pH and temperature change and its effect on food, evaluating artificial sweeteners and energy drinks, practicing safe food handling, understanding and generating food labels, and preparing balanced plates. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs.
    • BIO 112
    • General Biology II
    • 4
    This course is a continuation of Biology I. Lecture topics include: Vertebrate animals with emphasis on morphology, behavior, reproduction, and embryology of the human organism. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Placement at ENG 101 level strongly advised.
    • BIO 204
    • Genetics
    • 5
    This course focuses on mechanisms of inheritance, gene structure and function, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, and evolution. The model systems discussed in lecture are drawn from a broad spectrum of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics include: Gene regulations, modes of transmission, DNA molecular method, population genetics, and genomics. Safety protocols must be observed in all lab classes. These include: no food, no drink, and no open-toe shoes, appropriate clothing. Only registered students may enter labs. Prerequisite: BIO 111 with “C” or better.

The Associate in Science Health Sciences degree utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of health sciences. It provides students with a strong core foundation in both biological sciences and liberal arts and offers elective studies of community and public health, sociology, or ethics that will be applicable to a wide range of careers in health, human services, or public health. It prepares students to complete further health science-related programs of study, transfer to a four-year program of study or enter the workforce in an entry-level position in related health sciences.

Program Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:

• Demonstrate a foundation of knowledge in the biological sciences based on theory and laboratory skills.
• Demonstrate the ability to think critically and to be able to solve problems by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.
• Identify health problems, associated challenges, and potential opportunities.
• Explain the role of policy in health services delivery.
• Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.

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